Tag Archives: North East England

Another Twenty North East villages

DAVID SIMPSON explores another twenty villages in the North East of England, stretching across the historic counties of Durham and Northumberland from the River Tees to the River Tweed. What’s your favourite North East village?

Thatched cottage, Etal village
Thatched cottage, Etal village, Northumberland Photo © David Simpson 2018

A few years ago we explored a selection of twenty villages of different kinds across the North East of England. You can read our blog on the original twenty featured villages here: twenty North East villages.

We weren’t necessarily claiming these were the most beautiful ones (though there were some strong candidates) or even saying they were the most interesting villages. We did find that there are a great variety of North East villages and that they can be found in some interesting locations, sometimes completely swallowed up by neighbouring towns.

In this blog we thought we’d visit some more North East villages focusing on a further twenty places. It’s still not an exhaustive list of course, and it’s a relatively random selection but we’d like to know what’s your personal favourite?

Etal Post Office.
Etal village Post Office. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Norham

Northumberland

Norham is sitauted near the banks of the River Tweed in north Northumberland. It was once the capital of Norhamshire, an outlying part of the County Palatine of Durham and belonged to Durham’s Prince Bishops. In Anglo-Saxon times it had been one of the most important posthumous resting places for St Cuthbert, who was carried under the protection of the wandering monks who fled the Viking raids on Lindisfarne. The impressive Norham Castle was built by the Prince Bishop, Ranulf Flambard and strengthened as a formidable fortress by a successor called Bishop Pudsey. It played an important role in defending the north from the Scots. Norham is a place of notable history. It was here that the Scottish king John De Balliol paid homage to King Edward I of England.

Norham village and castle
Norham village and castle Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Norham-on-Tweed

Sadberge

Near Darlington

Here’s another place that was once a ‘capital’ in its own right. Situated just off the busy A66 between Stockton and Darlington Sadberge seems to have a Norse name meaning ‘flat-topped hill’, which describes its location overlooking the Tees Valley. Sadberge was the capital of the only Viking ‘wapentake’ in North East England, north of the River Tees. Wapentakes were assembly places where Vikings discussed the affairs of their local district – taking their weapons with them.

Comemorative stone Sadberge
Comemorative stone Sadberge Photo © David Simpson

The Wapentake of Sadberge included numerous parishes stretching from Hartlepool to Teesdale. After the Norman Conquest the district formed an outlying part of Northumberland but was acquired by Hugh Pudsey, Prince Bishop of Durham in 1189. Although it became part of Durham, Sadberge retained some independence, administered as an almost separate county until 1576. There were still references to ‘the Counties of Durham and Sadberge’ as late as the 19th century.  A plaque attached to a large  stone on the village green recalls the historic status of Sadberge.

Read about Sadberge

Whittingham

Northumberland

“Are you going to Whittingham Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme.”

The familiar lyrics associated with the better-known  ‘Scarborough Fair’ song might well have originated from the almost identical verses of the Northumberland folk song: ‘Whittingham Fair’. Situated in the upper part of the River Aln Valley in what is known  as ‘Whittingham Vale’, the village of Whittingham was indeed once the site of a fair. The village is home to a medieval church and a defensive pele tower, though both were extensively restored and rebuilt by the Tyneside architect John Dobson in the 1840s.

Whittingham village
Whittingham village and tower. Photo: ©David Simpson 2018

Read about Whittingham, the Aln and Alnwick

Castle Eden

County Durham

Popular with commuters working on Tyneside, Wearside and Teesside due to its proximity to the A19, this village lies close to the new town of Peterlee and the beautiful wooded valley of Castle Eden Dene, a site of Special Scientific Interest. The village itself is pretty, yet tiny, with a charming eighteenth century church dedicated to St James. Associated outlying hamlets feature the Castle Eden Inn and a former brewery building with an attached stable block. There’s also a neat terrace of 1792 known as ‘The Factory’ that once formed part of a spinning mill. The ‘castle’ of Castle Eden is in fact an 18th century castellated mansion house built by the Newcastle architect William Newton for local industrialist Rowland Burdon.

The village, Castle Eden
The village, Castle Eden. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Castle Eden

Corbridge

Northumberland

Often styled a ‘village’ Corbridge is in many respects a small town and one of the most historic places in the region. Gloriously situated in the Tyne valley and in the heart of the Roman Wall Country, Corbridge was once the site of a Roman town that was later, for a time, one of the capitals of the Kingdom of Northumbria. Village or not, it is indisputably a very charming place with lots of interesting stone buildings including a vicar’s pele and old houses such as Low Hall and Monksholme.

Corbridge scenes © David Simpson 2020

Read about Corbridge

Elsdon

Northumberland

Hae ye ivver been at Elsdon ?
The world’s unfinished neuk
It stands amang the hungry hills,
An’ wears a frozen leuk.

The old rhyme relating to the Redesdale village of Elsdon doesn’t exactly make Elsdon sound like an appealing prospect, but it no doubt dates from the distant days of  Border raids and reiving. In truth Eldson is a delightful village with an enormous village green, a friendly pub and charming church. A most interesting feature is the medieval fortified vicar’s pele designed to keep the local clergy protected during the Border troubles. The nearby gallows known as ‘Winter’s Gibbet’ serve to remind of darker days in history.

Vicar's Pele, Elsdon
The village of Elsdon in Redesdale showing the vicar’s pele Photo © David Simpson 2019

Read about Elsdon

Earsdon

North Tyneside

An attractive village of neat Georgian houses near Whitley Bay, Earsdon once belonged to Tynemouth Priory. The original medieval church in the village was replaced by the architects John and Benjamin Green in the 1830s. The churchyard includes a memorial to the 204 men and boys who lost their lives in the Hartley Colliery disaster of 1862.

Earsdon
Earsdon. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Earsdon

Seaton Sluice

Northumberland

The picturesque little Northumberland coastal village of Seaton Sluice is situated on the Seaton Burn a little to the north of Whitley Bay. It was developed as a coastal coal port from the 1660s by members of the Delaval family who built sluice gates to control the level of water in their haven. In the 18th century a 900 feet long cut was created to improve access from the sea. An intriguing octagonal building of the 18th century once served as a customs house. It was perhaps the idea of the architect John Vanbrugh who built the nearby Seaton Delaval Hall.

Seaton Sluice
Seaton Sluice, showing the natural outlet to the left and new cut to the right. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Seaton Sluice 

Cleadon

South Tyneside

Charles Dickens once stayed in Cleadon with his friend George Cooper Abbs. Abbs may have shared the story of a local groom jilted by his bride. The man had organised a pre-wedding party in his dining room. Heartbroken, he ordered that the room should be left as it was then laid out, for the rest of his days. It may have provided Dickens with inspiration for the Miss Haversham story in Great Expectations. A particularly interesting feature of the village is a castellated tower house known as Cleadon Tower, which dates back to the 1490s. Nearby towers of a quite different kind are a disused windmill and a waterworks tower that are landmarks for miles around.

Cleadon village
Cleadon village : Photo © David Simpson

Read about Cleadon

Romaldkirk

County Durham

A little bit controversial this one, because although it is administratively in County Durham and most definitely  in Teesdale Romaldkirk is actually south of the River Tees, so it was historically a Yorkshire village annexed by County Durham in 1974 during a local government shakeup. It’s a pretty place nevertheless, situated on the south side of the river about half way between the valleys of the River Lune and River Balder which both join the River Tees on the south bank. The village is named from its local church, dedicated to a Northumbrian saint called  Romald about whom very little is known.

Romaldkirk.
Romaldkirk. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Romaldkirk

Ford and Etal

Northumberland

Two very pretty villages here but quite close together and its impossible to resist visiting one without seeing the other, along with the lovely Heatherslaw Mill that lies between the two. Ford and Etal come as a complete package and are a must for any visit to the far north of Northumberland. Ford features a medieval castle that was once the stronghold of the Heron family. However, the beautiful village of Ford that we see today was laid out by the Marchioness of Waterford in the 19th century.

Ford village main street
Ford village main street Photo © David Simpson 2018

Etal village to the north also has a medieval castle but is principally noted for its thatched cottages, which are an unusual feature for a Northumberland village. Most of the houses in the village date from the eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth century.

Etal village
Etal village, Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Ford and Etal

Witton-le-Wear

County Durham

Situated more or less at the point where the ‘Wear Valley’ becomes Weardale, Witton-le-Wear is a pretty village of stone houses. It was part of the historic district of County Durham known as Aucklandshire. A notable building in the village is Witton Tower, a fortified tower house of medieval origin (it’s a private residence).  The tower should not be confused with the nearby Witton Castle which partly dates back to 1410. Close to Witton-le-Wear are the extensive wetlands of the Low Barnes nature reserve. Witton-le-Wear is quite separate from the neighbouring village of Witton Park which has important historic links to the Stockton and Darlington Railway.

Witton Castle.
Witton Castle. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Witton-le-Wear

Alnmouth

Northumberland

In its quiet, splendid seaside setting at the mouth of the River Aln it is hard to imagine why the eighteenth century preacher, John Wesley, should have described Alnmouth as “a small sea port town famous for all kinds of wickedness.” It’s certainly a place of great beauty with a  lovely river mouth harbour, quaint main street and a beautiful beach to wander along. Our favourite fact about Alnmouth is that during the American War of Independence Alnmouth was fired at from offshore with cannon balls by the American privateer John Paul Jones.

Alnmouth.
Alnmouth. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Alnmouth

Shincliffe

County Durham

Situated near the southern outskirts of Durham City, Shincliffe has an intriguing name that means ‘hill of the ghost or spectre’. A quiet little place of charming houses and a little village pub, Shincliffe belonged to the Priors of Durham Cathedral in medieval times. There was often rivalry between the bishops and priors of Durham and in 1300 it is recorded that the bishop’s men attacked the Prior on Shincliffe Bridge, which crosses the River Wear here.

Shincliffe
Shincliffe. © David Simpson

Read about Shincliffe and the Elvet area of Durham

Beadnell

Northumberland

Situated on the stupendous shore of the rocky Beadnell Bay, the name Beadnell derives from ‘Bede’s halh’, the spur of land belonging to Bede but probably not named from the famed venerable saint of that name. The main streets in Beadnell are the Wynding and the Haven and the main focal point of the village is the church dedicated to St Ebba.

Beadnell
Beadnell © David Simpson 2020

Read about Beadnell

Shotley Bridge

County Durham

A large and extensive ‘village’ – in truth much more of a town – on the banks of the River Derwent in County Durham. The old stone bridge links the county to Northumberland just across the river where there is a much smaller settlement simply called ‘Shotley’. Once a popular spa, Shotley Bridge has some interesting ‘Swiss-style’ houses associated with this heyday. The place also has strong links to the former iron industry of neighbouring Consett and from the late 1600s was associated with a sword making industry brought here by German artisans escaping religious persecution.

Cutlers hall Shotley Bridge
Cutlers hall Shotley Bridge. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Shotley Bridge

Piercebridge

Darlington, County Durham

Situated at the point where the Roman road called Dere Street crossed the River Tees, most of the village is situated around a village green on the north (Durham) side of the river. To the rear of the houses on the east side of the green are the extensive remains of a Roman fort which guarded the river crossing. Part of the village on the Yorkshire side features the sadly recently closed George Hotel with its links to the famous ‘My Grandfather’s Clock’ song by Henry C Work.

Roman Piercebridge
Remains of the Roman fort at Piercebridge. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Read about Piercebridge

Boulmer

Northumberland

Once a focal point for Northumbrian and Scottish smugglers such as Blind Wull Bawmer o’ Jethart, Boulmer is a rugged coastal village that nestles above a beach.  The focal point for the village is the Fishing Boat Inn. Fishing nets and fishing boats all add to the serenity of the setting.

Boulmer
Boulmer © David Simpson 2020

Read about Boulmer

Tynemouth

Tynemouth, technically a town, is cherished and beloved as ‘the village’ by numerous visitors from Newcastle and big-town Tyneside. It certainly has something of a village charm about it in places and the focal point for its western end is ‘the green’. Of course Tynemouth is so easily accessible by Metro and the real draw is the splendid beach, overlooked by the magnificent setting of castle and priory on the deeply historic headland at the beautiful mouth of the Tyne.

The Green, Tynemouth
The Green, Tynemouth : David Simpson 2015

Read about Tynemouth

What’s your favourite North East village?

  • Do let us know in the comments below what your favourite village is and why. If you’re on Twitter why not tweet  your favourite village especially if you’ve got some great photos to show it off. Details below:

In our original feature on Twenty North East villages we featured the following villages:

  • Bamburgh
  • Norton
  • Craster
  • Brancepeth
  • Bellingham
  • Billingham
  • Wallsend Green
  • Holy Island Village
  • Whitburn
  • Blanchland
  • Sedgefield
  • Gainford
  • New York
  • West Auckland
  • Heighington
  • Beamish
  • Whickham
  • Hart
  • Staindrop
  • Backworth

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North East Quiz 9

Test your knowledge of North East England with our ninth North East England history quiz.

Duddo stone circle.
Duddo, Northumberland. See question 26. Photo © David Simpson 2018

1. What is the name of the North East street pictured below?

Sandhill Newcastle
Street scene. See Question 1 : Photo © David Simpson 2015

2. What was the nationality and name of the sailor and privateer who bombed the Northumbrian village of Alnmouth with a cannon ball from his passing ship on September 23, 1779?

Alnmouth
Alnmouth. Photo © David Simpson 2018

3. Where would you find a sculpture of a male and female called ‘The Couple’ standing on a platform out in the middle of the sea watched over by a much smaller but otherwise identical couple on the shore?

'The Couple', Newbiggin
‘The Couple’, Photo © David Simpson 2018

4. Where might you find the ghost of Archie Armstrong?

5. What was the name of the ship that struck one of the Farne Islands on the morning of 7th September 1838 and resulted in the famous rescue involving the heroic lighthouse keeper’s daughter, Grace Darling?

6. Broad and Trinity in Newcastle; Church, Low and Middle in Chester-le-Street; Castle and Wear in Bishop Auckland; Castle in Durham and Church in Whickham are all examples of what?

7. Originally from County Durham but principally associated with North Northumberland, what were the Culley Brothers, Matthew and George (born 1730 and 1734) noted for?

8. Name the famous furniture designer born at Stockton-on-Tees in 1751 who shares a family name with a North East village near the A19?

9. By what name is the Battle of Branxton (1513) better known?

10. Which picturesque North East village was laid out by Louisa, the Marchioness of Waterford?

Ford village main street
Pretty village main street, Northumberland. Question 10. Photo © David Simpson 2018

11. In the courtyard of which Newcastle quayside institution will you find a former almshouse of 1787 and an anchor from the Spanish Armada of 1588?

12. Which North East town was the birthplace of Frank Williams of Formula One racing fame?

13. Which famous North East battle took place in Redesdale, Northumberland in 1388 and involved the Northumberland Percys and the Douglas family of Scotland?

14. Who composed the North East song Keep Your Feet Still Geordie Hinny?

15. What was the name and occupation of the Akenside from whom Newcastle’s Akenside Hill takes its name?

16. Where in the North East would you find the picturesque Trafalgar Square situated around a green with a plaque commemorating 76 local sailors who served at the Battle of Trafalgar?

Trafalgar Square, Sunderland
Trafalgar Square : Photo © David Simpson

17. Which battle fought near the Roman Wall a few miles north of Hexham persuaded the victorious Northumbrian king, Oswald to convert to Christianity and who were the opponents in the battle?

18. Name the Swalwell-born composer who reputedly wrote the tune to Auld Lang Syne?

19. Where might you have once found an eighteenth century military defensive instalment called the Black Cat battery?

20. What is significant about Ellington in terms of North East coal mining and what was the nickname with which the mine was associated?

Ellington.
Ellington village, Northumberland. Photo © David Simpson 2018

21. Which two North East rivers are separated by the sandy Cambois beach?

Cambois beach looking south towards Blyth
Cambois beach looking south. Photo © David Simpson 2018

22. With which North East colliery village would you have associated Richard Haswell’s fictional character ‘Geordie Broon?

23. Where would you find Javel Groupe?

24. Who was the renowned journalist born at Embleton in North Northumberland and what was his eventual fate?

25. Which American comedian indirectly takes his name from a Northumbrian ballad that commemorates a Cheviot hunt and the Battle of Otterburn?

View of the Cheviots from the Duddo stones.
View of the Cheviots near Duddo. Photo © David Simpson 2018

26. What ancient site can you find in the middle of a field with great surrounding views near the village of Duddo in north Northumberland?

Teesdale
Teesdale. Photo © David Simpson 2018

27. White-washed farm-houses in Teesdale usually signify that they are part of which landed estate?

28. Which Newcastle street was historically associated with the distinctive keelmen fraternity who transported coal to ships on the Tyne using their boats called keels?

29. What is Sting’s real name?

30. Name the five rivers found in Tyne and Wear?

Two rivers at Jarrow. Photo: David Simpson

31. Name the ten rivers found in the historic county of Durham and the three rivers that it acquired  from the North Riding of Yorkshire in the 1970s following boundary changes?

32. What is the name of the famous character created by the Hartlepool cartoonist Reg Smythe (1917-1998)?

33. Until 1836 what was unusual about the districts of Bedlingtonshire, Norhamshire and Islandshire in Northumberland?

34. Born and brought up in Teesdale near Barnard Castle, name the explorer and renewable energy champion who was the first man to walk to both poles?

35. Which prominent North East family were closely associated with Streatlam near Barnard Castle and Gibside near Gateshead?

36. Which North East village was known as ‘Little Moscow‘ from its communist sympathies and a street called Marx and Lenin Terrace?

37. Shiremoor in North Tyneside was named from which historic North East district or ‘shire’?

38. What was the name of the German industrialist who was the first mayor and first MP for Middlesbrough?

39. What famous Roman fort is located at Chesterholm in Northumberland?

40. Where would you find Killingworth Billy and what is it?

Answers below

 

Answers

  1. Sandhill, a quayside street, Newcastle upon Tyne
  2. John Paul Jones. He was American.
  3. Newbiggin-by-the-Sea.
  4. Haughton Castle, Northumberland.
  5. The Forfarshire.
  6. They are all ‘Chares’.
  7. Farmers who bred the Border Leicester sheep.
  8. Thomas Sheraton.
  9. Flodden Field.
  10. Ford village, Northumberland.
  11. Trinity House.
  12. South Shields.
  13. Otterburn.
  14. Joe Wilson.
  15. Mark Akenside. He was a poet.
  16. Sunderland.
  17. Heavenfield. King Oswald fought against the Welsh.
  18. William Shield.
  19. Sunderland.
  20. Ellington was the region’s last colliery. The mine was known as ‘The Big E’.
  21. The River Wansbeck and River Blyth.
  22. Backworth.
  23. Newcastle quayside.
  24. W.T. Stead. He died on board the Titanic.
  25. Chevy Chase.
  26. Duddo standing stones, a small stone circle.
  27. Raby.
  28. Sandgate.
  29. Gordon Sumner.
  30. Rivers Tyne, Derwent, Team, Don and Wear.
  31. Rivers Tyne, Derwent, Team, Don, Wear, Tees, Browney, Deerness, Gaunless and Skerne. The River Balder, River Lune and River Greta were moved into Durham from Yorkshire.
  32. Andy Capp.
  33. They were part of County Durham (The County Palatine of Durham).
  34. Robert Swan.
  35. The Bowes family.
  36. Chopwell.
  37. Tynemouthshire.
  38. Henry Bolckow.
  39. Vindolanda.
  40. It’s a locomotive found at the Stephenson Railway Museum, North Shields.

North East Quiz 8

Test your knowledge of North East England with our latest North East England quiz focusing on the history, geography and culture of the region.

Roman gatehouse at Arbeia
Reconstruction of a Roman gatehouse at Arbeia : Photo © David Simpson

1, Which place in the North East was known to the Romans as Arbeia meaning ‘place of the Arabs’? In Roman times it was home to a unit of bargemen from the River Tigris in what is now Iraq.

2, What is the name of the sculptor who created Tommy at Seaham and Fiddlers Green at North Shields?

‘Tommy’  at Seaham. Photo: © 2018 David Simpson

3. Which North East comedian was known as ‘The Little Waster‘?

4. Who was the Norton-on-Tees born director of Quadrophenia and creator or Auf Wiedersehen Pet (which he pitched to Ian La Frenais)?  He also created TV’s Master Chef.

5, What was the name of the community venture situated in a County Durham town that was sometimes known as the Pitmen’s Academy? It unearthed and encouraged the talents of pitmen like the writer, Sid Chaplin and local artists Norman Cornish and Tom McGuinness.

6. What is the name of the river local to Ashington and Morpeth?

River Wansbeck near Sheepwash, Ashington.
Here is the river at Sheepwash near Ashington. Question 6, Photo © David Simpson 2018

7. Which North East castle chillingly claims to be Britain’s most haunted?

8 .What was supposedly slain at Cleve’s Cross near Ferryhill by Hodge of Ferry around the year 1200?

9. Who was the author of De Temporum Ratione (The Reckoning of Time) that became the major influence for the way in which we still count our years today from the birth of Christ ?

10. What shapes feature on the ancient and mysterious prehistoric markings such as those found on Doddington Moor in north Northumberland?

11. Which famous entertainer and comedian once resided in Bishop Auckland and in North Shields’ Dockwray Square – where there is a statue to his honour?

Stan Laurel, Laurel Park, Dockwray Square, North Shield
Dockwray Square, North Shields. Photo © David Simpson 2018

12. What is the official name of the Lady of the North, a 44 acre landscape sculpture near Cramlington?

Northumberlandia, the Lady of the North
The Lady of the North. Photo Question 12. © David Simpson 2018

13. Where in the North East did King Cnut allegedly have his hair cut in the year 1031 before visiting St Cuthbert’s shrine at Durham?

14. What is the name of the Middlesbrough-born artist and former shipyard worker noted for his abstract art and ‘square sheep’?

15. In which Northumbrian dale can you find Otterburn?

16. In 1747 what did the Sedgefield vicar’s wife do to her deceased husband to ensure that she kept receiving payment for parish tithes?

17. Where on the North East coast would you find Sparrow Hall?

The remains of Sparrow Hall in the old part of Cullercoats.
The remains of Sparrow Hall. Photo © David Simpson 2018

18. Which frequently altered Northumberland village-name provided the inspiration for a lengthy comedy routine by the comedian Stewart Lee?

19. What famous painting by Velazquez was housed for many years in a grand hall near Barnard Castle from which it took its name?

20. What are the names of the twin rivers with valleys just to the west of Durham City that join together near the town of Langley Moor before joining the River Wear near Croxdale?

21. Which North East city has a place-name that is thought to mean ‘separated land’?

Jack Crawford nailing his colours to the mast, Mowbray Park
Jack Crawford nailing his colours to the mast. Question 22: Photo © David Simpson

22. Where would you find a monument to Jack Crawford, the hero of the Battle of Camperdown, nailing the colours to a ship’s mast?

23. The Prudhoe-born and Berwick-raised actor Henry Travers (1974-1965) is famous for playing which role in a black and white Christmas themed movie?

24. For what notorious activity was the Northumbrian village of Boulmer principally noted in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century?

25. Name the South Shields-born director (left)  whose movie credits include Blade RunnerGladiator, Thelma and Louise, Blackhawk Down and Alien?

26. What links the crags on which Hadrian’s Wall stands, Bamburgh Castle rock, the Farne Islands and High Force waterfall in Teesdale?

27. What was the name of the Anglo-Saxon palace of King Edwin of Northumbria of which the outlines including an auditorium can be traced in aerial photographs in Glendale to the west of Wooler?

28. What is the surname of the Ryton-born folk duo sisters Rachel and Becky?

29. Hesleyside in North Tynedale was the principal seat of which North East border reiver clan?

30. Which famous North East MP, commemorated in song, once resided at Whitworth Hall near Spennymoor?

Whitworth Hall.
Whitworth Hall. See question 30. Photo © David Simpson 2018

31. Alnwick, Sedgefield and at one time Chester-le-Street are linked by which February tradition?

32. Where was the Dean and Chapter Colliery located?

33. Which famous North East ship, built at Wallsend In 1907 captured the Blue Riband prize for her eastbound transatlantic voyage that was achieved during the maiden voyage return? She then went on to claim the same prize for the westbound journey across the Atlantic during 1909.

Segedunum and the Tyne at Wallsend.
Segedunum Roman fort (bottom right). Photo © David Simpson 2018

34. Segedunum was the Roman name for the fort in which North East town?

35. What remarkable discovery was found at Howick on the Northumberland coast in 1983?

36. In terms of national boundaries what is unusual about the course of the river called the Bowmont Water in North Northumberland.

37. What was the name of the Bishop of Durham who founded Durham University? He was also, technically, the last ‘Prince Bishop’.

38. What links names such as Shaftoe, Storey, Robson, Charlton, Heron, Milburn, Collingwood, Armstrong, Elliot, Fenwick, Forster, Ridley, Nixon, Potts and Pringle?

39. Which Northumberland village gave its name to the battle of 1018 which resulted in the loss of much Northumbrian territory and more or less established the border with Scotland as it exists today?

Raby Castle
Raby Castle © David Simpson 2018

40. Brancepeth Castle near Durham, Raby Castle in Teesdale and Middleham Castle in Wensleydale in Yorkshire were the principal seats of which powerful northern family of medieval times?

Answers below

Answers

  1. South Shields.
  2. Ray Lonsdale.
  3. Bobby Thompson.
  4. Franc Roddam.
  5. The Spennymoor Settlement.
  6. River Wansbeck.
  7. Chillingham.
  8. The Brancepeth Brawn, a wild boar.
  9. The Venerable Bede.
  10. Cup and Ring markings.
  11. Stan Laurel.
  12. Northumberlandia.
  13. Trimdon.
  14. McKenzie Thorpe.
  15. Redesdale.
  16. She pickled him, to preserve his body and pretend he was still alive.
  17. Cullercoats.
  18. Shilbottle.
  19. The Rokeby Venus.
  20. The River Browney and River Deerness.
  21. Sunderland.
  22. Sunderland’s Mowbray Park.
  23. Clarence the Angel in ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’.
  24. Smuggling.
  25. Ridley Scott.
  26. The Great Whin Sill.
  27. Ad Gefrin (Yeavering).
  28. Unthank.
  29. The Charltons.
  30. Bobby Shafto.
  31. Shrove Tuesday football matches.
  32. Ferryhill.
  33. The Mauretania.
  34. Wallsend.
  35. Traces of a Stone Age house.
  36. The river begins in Scotland then heads northward – yes northward – into England.
  37. William Van Mildert.
  38. They’re all Border Reiver surnames.
  39. Carham on Tweed.
  40. The Nevilles.