Tag Archives: Durham

View from the Top

Durham Cathedral western towers
The western towers of Durham Cathedral and the River Wear viewed from the cathedral’s central tower. Photo © David Simpson 2019

Durham Cathedral’s stunning central tower reopened to the public during 2019 after extensive repairs. DAVID SIMPSON takes a trip to the top and enjoys splendid city views that include the Newcastle skyline and parts of Sunderland as well as the beautiful county and city of Durham.

It’s many years since we’ve climbed to the top of Durham Cathedral’s central tower. The tower re-opened to visitors earlier this year following extensive much-needed repairs, so a crisp autumnal Saturday afternoon in November seemed a perfect time to go and check it out.

Durham Cathedral steps
The spiral steps to the top of Durham Cathedral are relatively broad to begin with. Photo: © David Simpson 2019

During 2013, an inspection of Durham’s cathedral tower had highlighted the need for extensive conservation work. Fortunately, the cathedral was able to draw on funding from the newly established First World War Centenary Cathedral Repairs Fund which contributed significantly to the £1.9 million needed to carry out the repair work on this iconic North East landmark.

Inside the cathedral tower, Durham. The steps are quite narrow from here on. Photo © David Simpson 2019

Scaffolding appeared around the central tower in late 2015 accompanied by bright white protective sheeting that locals referred to as the ‘bandage’. Such ‘tender loving care’ was a necessary if a little bit of a frustrating interlude for visitors and photographers wanting to capture the cathedral’s full beauty. Finally, however, the work was completed in May 2019 and the tower re-opened for the public to enjoy once more.

Chapel of the Nine Altars, Durham Cathedral
Chapel of the Nine Altars, Durham Cathedral. Photo © David Simpson 2019

The cathedral’s central tower is 218 feet high (66.45m) and you need to negotiate 325 spiral steps to reach the top. So it’s probably not for the faint-hearted. Opening times can be found on the cathedral website and it costs £5 for the climb (£2.50 for children) with a number of advisory warnings on the website which we recommend reading. It’s worth knowing that the tower has the steepest and most narrow spiral of any cathedral in England and Wales.

Feeling fit and trying to shake off a bit of a discomforting cold from too many hours cooked up in a warm office, I walked into Durham from a village three miles to the east, paid my entrance fee and embarked on the cathedral climb. The spiral steps are quite broad at first, just to get you going and break you in gently. Then you reach a half way point, with a resting room and a long corridor that features displays relating to the cathedral and the tower’s restoration. At the far end of the corridor a sign dated 1783 directs us through another door where the spiral steps are significantly narrower.

Durham Castle from the cathedral tower
Durham Castle from the cathedral tower. Photo © David Simpson 2019

It’s exhilarating when you reach the top and there was plenty of company yet still plenty of space. The view is simply sublime. Briefly, however, I must say I felt a slight touch of vertigo but quickly adjusted to the height. Durham looks rather like ‘Toy Town’ from up here, but a very picturesque Toy Town at that. Little cars and little people wander the neighbouring streets such as the Bailey and Owengate and Palace Green. Neighbouring South Street glimmered in the sunlight, with the water mill on the weir of the Wear far below. Here and there you could see preparatory activities for the forthcoming Lumiere festival.

The bailey, Durham from the cathedral tower.
The Bailey, Durham from the cathedral tower. Photo © David Simpson 2019

There’s plenty of city landmarks to pick out – and not just Durham City landmarks. To the west we just about spotted the old miners’ hall in Redhills on the fringe of the beautiful woodland of Flass Vale. Here also we can see the city’s viaduct, Durham County Hall and the nearby hospital. A little closer to us we find Redhills Lane leading to the site of the Battle of Nevilles Cross of 1346. It’s known that some of the monks of Durham Cathedral monastery observed the battle from the vantage point of the cathedral’s tower all those centuries ago.

We observed the chapel of Durham School and the former Catholic seminary college at Ushaw. To the east and south east you can pick out Old Durham Farm and Old Durham Gardens near the site of an ancient Romano-British settlement and nearby the yet more ancient wooded hill fort site of Maiden Castle. To the south you see mostly hills, to Ferryhill and beyond.

Durham viaduct viewed from Durham Cathedral tower
Durham viaduct viewed from Durham Cathedral tower. Photo © David Simpson 2019

The loop of the river surrounding the centre of the city demonstrates the importance of Durham’s defensive location. The historic streets, some dating back to medieval times are full of charm. There are long strings of Georgian and Victorian buildings that are brimming with character and various architectural styles forming a lacework along the hill sides. You can see an interesting contrast in style with the more modern buildings in Millburngate; the Prince Bishops Shopping Centre and the Durham University buildings around Mount Joy and Stockton Road.

Much can be seen beyond the centre of the city too. From the suburbs of Gilesgate and Newton Hall you can see out beyond to the neighbouring villages, all bordered by beautiful green patchwork fields and hedgerows broken by numerous russet coloured woodlands.

Newton Hall estate near Durham and Lumley Castle with the pormimemt office blocvk of Durham Tower at Washington on the horizon.
Newton Hall estate near Durham and Lumley Castle with the prominent office block of Durham Tower at Washington on the horizon. Photo © David Simpson 2019

I must have been up there for at least a quarter of an hour, probably more and I kept seeing more and more new things. Lumley Castle can clearly be seen and of course Penshaw Monument. The Nissan car factory can be clearly made out and the prominent Department of Work and Pensions office block called Durham Tower near the Galleries in Washington is an imposing landmark. So we can look across from one Durham tower to another distant Durham Tower of a very different kind. Those last three mentioned landmarks are all of course in the city of Sunderland but beyond I could also make out cranes on the Tyne, somewhere in the South Tyneside or North Tyneside area.

View of Newcastle from Durham Cathedral tower
View of Newcastle from Durham Cathedral tower. Photo © David Simpson 2019

In fact the view from up here is a tale of three cities as directly to the north the distant horizon is dominated by the most prominent buildings in the city of Newcastle. St James’ Park and the new Hadrian’s Tower development of course stand out but you can even make out the blue lantern tower of Newcastle Civic Centre. I’d definitely suggest taking a pair of small binoculars so you can make most of this splendid view.

Best of all though is the view of Durham City itself and it’s all well worth the £5 entry fee to the tower. Of course the descent is a lot less hard work than the ascent, though I did have a three mile walk home ahead of me as well. Ah well, it was worth it for the exhilarating view.

Durham Cathedral tower opening times and details here

 

North East Maps, Gifts and Clothes by Tangled Worm

TANGLED WORM  is the online shop and sister site for England’s North East and is one way we raise revenue for the upkeep of our well-established North East site.

The England’s North East site began life as a bit of a hobby back in the 1990s and has continued to develop exponentially since.

Established by historian and former Northern Echo writer, David Simpson, it now features hundreds of pages covering North East history, culture and life. Running a site on this scale takes time and effort so revenue from the Tangled Worm shop at tangledworm.com goes towards maintaining and updating the site, even if it’s just to raise a bit of petrol money to go out and about and take photographs around the region.

With a name inspired by the worm legend stories of Northern England, Tangled Worm began life in March 2018 with a focus on maps featuring the history and heritage of North East England.

Prints featuring maps of Rude and Peculiar North East Place-Names, Border Reiver surnames, Viking Northumbria and North East Collieries have proved quite popular.

The initial focus was on these heritage maps which build on David’s extensive research into North East history. In recent months the Tangled Worm business has expanded into clothes, accessories and gifts, mostly with North East themes.

These products, with designs unique to Tangled Worm include mugs, clothes, coasters, cushions, tote bags, necklaces, door mats and tea towels and we are constantly expanding our ranges and products.

Our ranges include products with themes such as Hadrian’s Wall, Bamburgh Castle, the Angel of the North, Geordie words, Newcastle upon Tyne, Durham and Wearside as well as some products featuring our very own Tangly, the Tangled Worm which forms our logo.

Our Hadrian’s Wall range features a map of the Roman wall and the main forts. The range includes mugs, coasters and place mats, a maxi wallet and a tote bag featuring the famous Sycamore Gap.

Clothes by Tangled Worm include hoodies and t-shirts, all available in a choice of four colours in various sizes. For example our Angel T-shirt is available in grey, white, green and light blue.

We also do socks featuring our very own Tangly. Our tote bags likewise include a choice of four colours for each product. There are bags for Mackem Lasses, Geordie Lasses and Durham Lasses and others featuring the Angel, Sanctuary Knocker and Bamburgh.

We are proud of our region and it’s great that sales from Tangled Worm can be used towards keeping the England’s North East site up and running.

Check out our Tangled Worm Shop at tangledworm.com and help support a North East site and business.

Get Busy Outdoors this Spring

With ever-increasing signs of springtime emerging ANDREA SCOTT explores the worthwhile work of countryside volunteering through local wildlife trusts. It’s a great way to keep fit and contribute to improving the local environment.

Castle Eden Dene
Beautiful natural environment. Castle Eden Dene Photo © David Simpson 2018

As the first signs of Spring emerge, our local countryside becomes greener and more beautiful. One way to enjoy the thawing outdoors is to do some worthwhile volunteer work in your region. Volunteers can develop their interest in wildlife, improve local countryside, get fitter and meet like-minded people. They can look back on a project knowing that they’ve helped to make a positive difference.

The Wildlife Trust has around 43,000 volunteers in the United Kingdom. Northumberland Wildlife Trust (NWT) owns and manages 62 nature reserves with the help of over 250 volunteers. Their Community Conservation Project engages the public through its local nature reserves. These support a wide range of species, monitored by regular surveys. Task volunteers help with habitat management and maintenance of infrastructure.

Heart of Durham volunteers at Thornley Woods

Lou Chapman has been organising volunteers since 2009. “We have so many opportunities. Practical conservation out on nature reserves is our biggest role, however, people can help out in our cafes, information assistance to visitors on reserves, community engagement events, education programme, reception assistance, helping in the office environment. You name it, we probably do it!”

Volunteers are not held to a set timetable. “Time commitments vary depending upon the role you choose to do. For example, to do a practical conservation day, it’s a full day from 9:15am until 4pm or for helping on reception or in the café it can be a couple of hours on a given day. You don’t even have to do a weekly commitment, it’s very flexible… some people come once per month or even less. It’s fun and flexible and not a ‘job’. We want our volunteers to enjoy their time here and essentially want to come back.”

Lou wants to encourage potential new recruits. “Go for it, you won’t know if you like it if you don’t try. Whatever your skills and experience or background you are welcome. Even if you feel you don’t have any, we will train you up. At NWT we offer a ‘trial go’ so you can see what’s it’s like before fully registering. We know volunteering is not for everyone but we offer so many different opportunities… to get involved in both inside and outside that it’s worth giving it a try. Everyone is very friendly and open to new people coming in. It’s great for your mental health too!”

Durham Wildlife Trust volunteers, Rainton Meadows

Margaret Brabbon has been volunteering for Durham Wildlife Trust (DWT) for over 9 years. “Initially I was looking for something when I retired from a teaching profession. I am a practical person and enjoy being with people. I had never been involved with any conservation work before and thoroughly enjoy it. The advantage of volunteering here is that people can drop in and drop out when it suits them. I spend one day a week doing the conservation work and another two days helping with admin. The most enjoyable aspect about volunteering for me is being with completely new people from different walks of life and learning new skills. At all times of the year there are a variety of tasks and we get to see many different sites across the county…reclaimed quarries, meadows and coastal areas.”

Task force volunteer, Faye Butler attended a volunteer recruitment day and signed up. “I have been volunteering for DWT for over 3 years, having been a member of the trust for several years. I had a 35-year nursing career in the NHS and retired from my position as a matron in surgery prior to starting volunteering. I have a keen lifelong interest in nature and the outdoors and when thinking about my plan for retirement I knew I wanted to be involved in conservation and protecting the environment. I also wanted something that would help me keep fit in mind and body and as a nurse I am aware of the beneficial and therapeutic effects of being outdoors and working in green spaces.”

Kepier Wood Durham
Woodland at Kepier, Durham. Photo © David Simpson 2017

Faye says, “There are many aspects of volunteering with DWT which I enjoy: being part of a team and having new colleagues, having a hard day’s graft, learning new skills. Each week a programme of tasks to be undertaken are emailed out to the volunteer workforce. This could be anything from path repairs, building a boardwalk, felling trees, clearing out ponds or cutting back undergrowth. The task could be on any one of the many and diverse reserves managed by DWT. It is often hard physical work but you feel great at the end of the day with a real sense of achievement. I like the idea of lifelong learning and DWT is excellent at providing training opportunities. So far, I’ve been on a dry stone walling course, strimmer training and using pesticides training. I’ve also attended courses on identifying ferns, trees in winter, amphibians and reptiles. I like to think I am giving something back and helping DWT to protect and preserve wonderful environments for future generations.”

Forestry Commission England organise volunteers in practical conservation, vegetation management, maintenance of trails and wildlife surveys. Their Kielder Water and Forest Park hold special trail-building days to improve the forest’s vast network of walking, cycling and horse-riding trails. Volunteers are also needed for their Osprey Project, to watch nests and engage with the public at viewing sites. If that doesn’t appeal, there are jobs indoors, such as visitor centre work or help with reception or events.

At Hamsterley Forest, rangers lead volunteers on the first and third Thursday of every month to undertake trail checks and maintenance of facilities. Hamsterley Trailblazers focus on developing the forest’s full potential as a mountain bike centre. They organise monthly trail-building sessions to maintain existing cycle trails and develop new ones.

Local voluntary groups include the Gateshead-based, Friends of Chopwell Wood (FoCW) a practical maintenance group that meet in the woods (on second and fourth Wednesdays of the month). The group is more than ten years old and was formed by the FoCW committee to care for this very special woodland. Have a search locally, email a few groups to find out what they do and come along to try it out. The FoCW volunteers can take part in a wide range of projects, help run events like bat watching, pond dipping, fungal foraging, green wood-crafting, or help with litter picking and general maintenance. Regular volunteers help at least once a month but there are several one-off volunteering events where extra hands are needed such as the spring clean or the Woodfest event which require a couple of hours a year. Help is always required at their biggest annual event, the Christmas Experience and tree sales.

Cambois beach looking south towards Blyth
Cambois beach looking south towards Blyth. Photo © David Simpson 2018

Why not help to improve our coastal areas for wildlife as well as people? Beachwatch, a programme organised by the Martine Conservation Society, organise regular beach clean ups. All you need to do is sign up as a volunteer and turn up. Nic Emery, organiser of the Cambois beach cleans near Blyth recommends it. “Joining an organised event is great because likeminded folk are getting together and leave with an enormous sense of accomplishment after they helped remove hundreds of kilos of trash from the beach. Some of our volunteers aren’t even local – they come from all over the country!”

Volunteer Sharon Lashley has recently organised an event at Roker, as part of the 2018 Great British Beach Clean. “Our beach cleans are a great way of getting people involved locally and it’s important that we involve as many people as possible – they are also a great way of encouraging people to enjoy activities in the fresh air, socialise and network with others whilst, most importantly, tidying up the beaches and stopping litter and rubbish making its way back out to sea.”

Volunteers at Roker Beach. Photo: Media Borne mediaborne.co.uk

If gardening is your passion, why not get involved with the National Trust or English Heritage? Horticultural volunteers are needed all year round to help gardens thrive. As well as basic tasks, you can learn about planting schemes, supervise the gardens, give tours and demonstrations or interact with visitors. National Trust offer opportunities to help with their Coast and Countryside conservation project. Opportunities include dry stone walling, woodland work, maintenance of fencing and pathways, conducting bio-surveys of species and leading guided walks.

The Red Squirrels United group works to protect red squirrel strongholds through a robust grey squirrel management programme. It is a huge partnership, uniting more than thirty UK organisations. Why not join the 1200 community based rapid response team of volunteers? They assist in reporting grey sightings, monitoring feeders, setting up cameras and educating the public. Northeast Red Squirrels is a charity working with existing volunteer groups to engage with local communities to help conserve red squirrels. Their Red Squirrels Newcastle Project aims to boost the red population to the west of the city. ‘Adopt a Wood’ volunteers are currently needed to monitor feeders in the area. “Our strategy is ambitious, but with dedication from local volunteers and landowners is totally achievable.”

There are so many reasons to get involved. Personal benefits, mental, physical and social as well as helping to improve our natural environment and local wildlife. It could change your life. Why not contact one of your local organisations today?

Durham Wildlife Trust: 0191 5843112; email volunteer@durhamwt.co.uk

Northumberland Wildlife Trust: 0191 2846884; email volunteer@northwt.org.uk

Hamsterley Forest (Forestry Commission): Tel. 01388 488312; email laura.turtle@forestry.gsi.gov.uk

Kielder Water and Forest Park (Forestry Commission) www.visitkielder.com/outdoor-event/kielder-volunteers; Tel. 01434 250209;

Friends of Chopwell Wood friendsofchopwellwood.org.uk : Tel. 01207 542495

English Heritage: www.english-heritage.org.uk

National Trust: www.nationaltrust.org.uk/volunteer

Marine Conservation Society: www.mcsuk.org/how-you-can-help

Northeast Red Squirrels: 07779 577485; email info@northeastredsquirrels.co.uk

Red Squirrels United: www.redsquirrelsunited.org.uk