Tag Archives: Coast

Fiona finds colour in nature’s treasures of the deep

In our latest feature on North East creative talent we talk to artist Fiona Carvell who is based in the Northumberland countryside near Shotley Bridge.

Lindisfarne by Fiona Carvell
Lindisfarne by Fiona Carvell

Where exactly in the North East are you based?

On the border of County Durham and Northumberland, perched on the edge of the Pennines – beautiful space! Fine Studios at Fine House Farm, Kiln Pit Hill, Consett. DH8 9SL.

How would you describe your work?

Ideas-led, which means I let the subject matter inspire and direct how I respond (as opposed to working in the same way, or having a ‘style’ regardless of subject). Visually, I am interested in line and space, the connections between objects and relationships of pattern in nature.

Tell us how you first started out as an artist?

I graduated as an illustrator and moving image designer, which led to work both as a freelance Illustrator in publishing and then a career in broadcasting. I later moved into teaching but throughout all of this never stopped drawing. I would finish a shift for doing the on-air graphics for Sky News and then go straight to a life drawing class! Teaching in F.E. meant I could spend more time experimenting with materials but it wasn’t until I started running community-based art classes that I finally realised I needed to create more of my own art. It was clamouring to get out!

Fiona Carvell
North East artist, Fiona Carvell

My love affair with pastel started around this time and a few years later I entered a piece for the Pastel Society Open Exhibition in London which made the first selection round. I was invited to be a Unison Colour Associate Artist soon after this, which I am immensely proud of, especially as they are a North East company and sell around the world.

I was offered studio space at Fine Studios at the end of 2016, which is perfect for me as it’s just a few miles from home and an amazing place to run workshops from.

Which work are you most proud of?

Probably ‘Treasure of The Deep’, which was the first of my seaweed series. It was very big (over 3ft high once framed) which is huge for a pastel piece, and incredibly detailed.

Treasure of the Deep
Treasure of the Deep by Fiona Carvell

What inspires you?

Lots of things – I go through obsessions! I had a thing about grasses and then trees for a while last year and my current theme seems to be seaweed. I am drawn to connections in nature – patterns of line and surprises of colour, that echo from one life form to another.

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

The North East has a wealth of inspirational landscapes. From the Pennines to the beautiful Northumberland coastline, there is so much to draw upon. My parents live on the coast and so I spend quite a bit of time photographing and sketching at beaches and castles.

What has been your most challenging creation?

Probably ‘Treasure of The Deep’. There were so many colours in each tiny section, that I would cover only a few inches a day at some points. It drove me to distraction. I would often go to the studio in my running gear so I could run a few miles of tension off in between pastel painting!

Do you have any tips for up and coming artists?

Work hard, be practical and approach what you do as any profession. If you seriously want to develop a career as an artist, you must get the balance between personal creation/production and all the other stuff that makes it possible. Admin, promotions, attending events, keeping galleries supplied and happy are all part and parcel of the job. As a qualified teacher I still enjoy teaching workshops and have found this a valuable part of my practice as it helps to develop my own artwork.

Resilience by Fiona Carvell
Resilience by Fiona Carvell

Which other artists or photographers inspire you?

My favourite pastel artist is probably Sarah Bee. Just gorgeous line work and energy. The most inspiring exhibition I attended was in Paris a few years ago by fashion designer, Issey Miyake. He presented fabric as lines and forms of pleated colour in the most astonishing display that played with light and shade. I am a great believer in looking at everything the world presents to you for potential inspiration – it can come from anywhere.

What are your ambitions for the future?

I have just returned from running my first pastel workshop in France, (which was fabulous!) and I now have another planned for May 2019. I am also in the midst of planning my workshops at Fine Studios for 2019 alongside exhibitions at various venues across the country.

Long term, I would love to exhibit with the Pastel Society, that would be an achievement and a great honour.

Anything else you’d like to add?

My work is currently on display and for sale at Number Four Gallery, St.Abbs, Scotland www.numberfourgallery.co.uk

You can also buy my prints at Gallery 45 in Felton www.feltongallery45.co.uk

and at The Links Gallery in Whitley Bay www.linksgallery.org

You can catch me in person and my latest work at Art in the Pen, Skipton, Yorkshire, between August 11th and 12th. www.artinthepen.org.uk

For more information regarding my French workshop in 2019 go to www.sweetnothings.eu

I am also available for demonstrations or to to run art workshops in pastel and drawing at art groups and societies.

See more of Fiona’s work at:

www.fionacarvellart.co.uk

 

Northumberland’s landscape and light make the perfect picture for David

In our latest interview featuring creative people in North East England we talk to Hexham-based landscape photographer and writer David Taylor. 

Charlies Garden. Photo David Taylor
Charlies Garden, Colywell Bay near Seaton Sluice, Northumberland. Photo by David Taylor

Where in the North East are you based?

I live in Hexham, just twenty minutes’ drive from Hadrian’s Wall Country.

How would you describe your work?

I’m a landscape and architectural photographer who lives and works in the north east of England. I’m particularly inspired by the Northumberland countryside, from the craggy landscape of Hadrian’s Wall to the wild moorlands of the Cheviot hills.

David Taylor North East photographer
David Taylor North East photographer

How did you get into photography?

I borrowed my school’s camera (and there was only one…) when I was studying A-Level art,  and was immediately hooked. There’s something compelling about making an image in a small fraction of a second without the need for pen or pencil! I’ve always liked being outdoors so landscape photography seemed the most natural fit.

What are you most proud of as a photographer?

I’ve written forty books and contributed to many others. These books have either been about photography techniques and equipment, or about Northumberland. I didn’t start out with the intention of combining writing with photography but I’m proud of the fact that I’ve achieved that.

Peel Crags, Hadrian's Wall. Photo David Taylor
Summer mist over Peel Crags, Hadrian’s Wall. Photo David Taylor

What do you most enjoy photographing and why?

Water in is a fascinating subject. How it appears in the final photo depends on a number of factors, such as how it’s illuminated to the length of exposure used. I could quite cheerfully spend all day just photographing watery subjects such as the sea.

What inspires you? 

The quality of light on a landscape. Light changes throughout the day, varying depending on where the sun is in the sky and the current weather condition. It means you can revisit the same location over and over again and still see and shoot something different each time. I find this both challenging – you can’t know precisely what will work and what won’t until you get to a location and see how it’s illuminated – and creatively inspiring.

Bamburgh Castle. Photo David Taylor
Bamburgh Castle. Photo David Taylor

What influence, if any does North East England have upon your work? 

I’m from Newcastle originally and grew up there. I spent a lot of time on the coast when I was young, as well as camping in places like Gosforth Park. That early exposure to the landscape of the North East is something that has been very influential. As much as I like travelling and visiting other parts of the world, I can’t see me wanting to stop photographing in and around the North East.

College Valley. Photo David Taylor
Looking down the College Valley, Northumberland. Photo David Taylor

What has been your most challenging photographic creation? 

I’m always a bit suspicious of photos that happen easily! They somehow don’t feel earned. It’s those images that require work or perseverance to achieve that tend to be my favourites. One shot – the view down Henhole in the College Valley in the Northumberland National Park – took six hours of trudging in rain across wet moorland to achieve. It was at the point that I was more than ready to go home that the sun finally broke out. The resulting photo took just a few minutes to set up and shoot, but this more than made up for the fact that I was soaking wet and still have a long walk ahead of me.

Do you have any tips for up and coming photographers? 

Photography has a reasonably steep learning curve but it’s not impossible to understand the basics of how an image is made. Once you’ve achieved this it’s just a question of practise to refine how and what you shoot. Be prepared to take creative risks and make mistakes; it’s often the mistakes you make that give you the greatest insight in how you can improve your photography. Don’t give up and have fun!

Footprints on Bamburgh beach. Photo David Taylor
Footprints on Bamburgh beach. Photo David Taylor

What other photographers or artists inspire you? 

Although he’s not a landscape photographer, Elliott Erwitt is one of my favourite photographers. His documentary photography is full of humanity and often wickedly funny. For me, there’s nothing better than curling up on a wet, grey day with one of his photography anthologies. I’ve tried to shoot like Erwitt and wasn’t that successful. It was a good indicator that I should stick to landscape…

What are your ambitions for the future? 

To keep on learning about photography. It’s such a big subject that’s impossible to know everything. It’s a worthwhile ambition to try though!

See more of David Taylor’s photography at: www.davidtaylorphotography.co.uk

 

Northumberland Snow. Photo David Taylor

The Beast from the East hits the Northumberland National Park. Photo David Taylor

 

 

 

Sea and Sky : Artist finds inspiration in Craster coastline

DAVID SIMPSON talks to Northumberland artist Mick Oxley about his wonderful seascapes.

As part of our continuing commitment highlighting the work of North East artists, photographers, film makers, writers, musicians and other creative people we talk to 64 year artist Mick Oxley who lives and works in Craster.

Boulmer Glory. Painted by Mick Oxley
Boulmer Glory. Painted by Mick Oxley

Describe yourself and your work:

A painter whose work is influenced by the sea and shoreline of the Northumberland coast, it’s moods and atmosphere.

How did you start out as an artist?

I started painting in 1999, after retiring from teaching and I am wheelchair bound. I began under the tutelage of Gordon Highmoor at a WEA class in Craster. I went full time in 2003 and opened my gallery in 2008. I paint and sell from Craster.

Which work are you most proud of?

To be honest, I am proud of a lot of my work, although I do have one or two favourites. While I have worked very hard to get where I am, I also consider myself fortunate I decided to give painting a go.

Mick Oxley at work
Mick Oxley at work

What inspires you?

My biggest influence is the environment that surrounds me – the coastline, the moods of the sea, the kaleidoscopic changes. This provides me with a never ending source of inspiration.

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

I grew up in the North East, left to work elsewhere and always wanted to return. The area and its people are very much part of my DNA.

What has been your most challenging creation?

Usually very large paintings, when I can struggle to reach across the canvas. Not being able to stand can pose problems and I have to be extra creative.

Do you have any tips for up and coming artists?

Enjoy what you do, have fun, practise as much as you can and you will improve.

Which other artists inspire you?

My two biggest influences are the North Yorkshire artist Len Tabner and Norwegian Ornulf  Opdahl. Both artists had a profound influence on me when I began painting.

February Sunrise. Painted by Mick Oxley.
February Sunrise. Painted by Mick Oxley.

What are your ambitions for the future?

My aim is to carry on enjoying what I do. I like the dual role of painting and running the gallery. I enjoy meeting the customers and working from Craster.

Visit Mick website at: www.mickoxley.com

Mick is also on Twitter @mickoxley   and   @seaskycraster 

and Facebook too facebook.com/mickoxleygallery

Better still, why not pop along to Mick’s gallery in Craster and take in the wonderful Northumberland coast while you’re there?