Full of beans in the North East

With 70 million cups of coffee consumed in the UK every day, it’s easy to see why we’ve taken to roasting coffee on our doorstep. HELEN GILDERSLEEVE explores the region’s growing independent coffee roasteries, suppliers and cafes.

Pumphreys at Grainger Market
Pumphreys at the Grainger Market, Newcastle

Tyneside’s longest reigning coffee supplier is the much loved Pumphrey’s Coffee, based in Blaydon. Established in Newcastle’s Flesh Market (near the Bigg Market) back in 1750, Pumphrey’s is a true family business. Directors Stuart Archer (Snr) and son Stuart Archer (Jnr) provide top quality coffee and are dedicated to meeting customer requirements whether that be coffee beans, teas, brewing equipment or espresso machinery.

Pumphrey’s strive to purchase the finest coffee beans from around the world and roast them to order in the traditional way with flames. This involves open flame roasting drums dating back over 80 years and under the careful eye of master roaster Stuart Lee Archer, Pumphrey’s aim to provide delicious tasting, fresh coffee to their customers’ choosing.

Since 1983, Pumphrey’s Coffee has been based at Bridge Street in Blaydon. The site comprises a warehouse, factory, training room and a coffee shop open to trade and the general public.

Newer to the scene is the equally popular Ouseburn Coffee Co (OCC), based in Foundry Lane in Newcastle’s Ouseburn area. Established in 2012 by a small band of artisan coffee roasters and baristas it offers a highly selective range of coffee from around the world. All OCC coffee is lovingly roasted in small batch lots and bagged up fresh the same day.

OCC Harvest Canteen, Jesmond
OCC Harvest Canteen, Jesmond

Established in 2012 and offering ethically sourced seasonal coffee the coffee is roasted and bagged by hand in small batches on Foundry Lane in the heart of the Ouseburn Valley.

The business has gone from strength to strength and opened the doors of its Harvest Canteen café in Jesmond in 2014.

Famed for its simple, striking black and white design, which carries through to Harvest’s décor, the cafe has a clean, chic and relaxing feel and coffee lovers can pick anything from a flat white or an espresso through to a 7oz latte.

The more eccentric of coffee drinkers may even want to try OCC’s Cold Brew. Using just fresh roast single origin coffee, slow cold water extraction and triple filtration, OCC don’t add anything else to their brew and it is recommended to be enjoyed either on its own for the ultimate kick, with water or even added to gin or rum for a boozy drink with a difference.

They also have a regular stall at the popular Tynemouth Station Market every weekend. I love nothing more than sipping one of their lattes whilst browsing the market. This year also saw OCC boasting its own counter in Fenwick’s all new Food Hall. It certainly looks like there’s more to come from these guys.

BLK Coffee Heaton
BLK Coffee Heaton

A particular favourite of mine is BLK Coffee on Heaton’s bustling Chillingham Road. BLK has a regular rotation of beans from around the globe for the most dedicated and adventurous of coffee lovers.

The brainchild of BLK is local lass Alison Bell, who has her own coffee inspired blog and website- Black Coffee and Other Stories. BLK also stock amazing cakes every time I go in. Keep up the great work, Alison.

Pink Lane Coffee
Pink Lane Coffee, Newcastle upon Tyne

For city centre folk in need of a pick-me-up, Pink Lane Coffee near Newcastle’s Central Station has established itself as one of the foremost speciality coffee destinations in the region, featuring in publications such as Grazia, ShortList and the UK edition of the Condé Nast Traveller since opening in 2012.

Pink Lane Coffee is a spacious and creatively designed café featuring local art work and a quirky décor. It even has its own mini library of books to borrow for those like me who often forget to remember their own.

They now roast their own beans called Colour Coffee which are served at various cafes across the North East. Owner, Anth Atkinson, set up shop in Sandyford where he hopes to encourage locals to enjoy independent coffee.

Since Colour Coffee was founded in November 2013, near Corbridge, Northumberland, the firm has sourced a range of seasonal coffees from across the world, taking a scientific approach to production, with laptops and temperature sensors used to monitor and replicate each successful roast. Who knew science could taste so good?

Other fabulous independents across the region include the very popular Flat White in Durham, Flat Caps Coffee and Laneway & Co in Newcastle, Cullercoats Coffee and The Boatyard in Cullercoats, Navaho and Coolaboola in Jesmond, Holmeside Coffee and Café Eighteen in Sunderland and The Mockingbird Deli in Yarm, to name a few.

We truly are spoilt for choice.

@BLKCoffeeHeaton

@OuseburnCoffee

@PumphreysCoffee

@PinkLaneCoffee

 

Find out more about Helen Gildersleeve and our England’s North East bloggers here

Northern England’s BIG place in the world

DAVID SIMPSON considers the size and importance of Northern England and its place in the world and argues that the whole of the North should have a much bigger voice

Right let’s be clear, right from the very start, when it comes to people, the North of England is a pretty BIG place to be:

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Scotland’s population is around 5.3 million by the way.

Now, I’m not suggesting for one moment that the North of England – or any part of the North of England for that matter – should break away from the United Kingdom.

Heaven forbid!

I mean, for a start, we wouldn’t have won quite as many medals in the Olympics.

However, the three regions that make up the north – and not just the cities – do need a stronger and bigger voice that’s in keeping with their place in the world. In fact part of the problem is that they need to have a place in the world. Too often they’re seen as the fringes of England.

They’re more than that, in fact in many ways they are the real England.

Yet somehow, somewhere along the line, we’ve been conditioned to think small and the truth is we are very far from that. We have our own distinct history and a population that many nations in the world don’t come close too.

The North has a story all of its own – and it’s a big story and with deep roots.

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And we played no small part in what made our nation so powerful and successful in the past. In fact we played a major role in changing the world:

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Even the North’s smallest region  could have a much bigger voice:

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Whenever we think about the North, we need to remember to think big and ensure that we get our fair share of investment and a bigger say in our affairs.

Great Britain is not just all about London.

Without the North, it would be Not So Great Britain.

So, always speak up for the NORTH and let’s start by making sure that we are properly empowered to do so.

 

If you like this post you might like this follow up post  more maps:

A BIG populous region, that’s bigger than many nations

 

Find out more about David Simpson and our England’s North East bloggers here

So many reasons to get on yer bike

HELEN GILDERSLEEVE discovers the wide range of cycle-friendly cafés available across Newcastle and its surrounding areas.

The Cycle Hub, Newcastle
The Cycle Hub, Newcastle

What better way to enjoy the sun and our beautiful region than by having a tootle on a bike with some well-deserved cake at the end.

A decade or more ago, budding cyclists would struggle to find anywhere suitable for a mid-cycle pit stop. Now, the region’s cycle ways and popular routes are brimming with cafes full of lycra-clad riders and curious passers-by.

One of Newcastle’ s most central and well known cafés, The Cycle Hub has gone from strength to strength since it opened its doors a few years ago on Route 72 of Hadrian’s Cycleway.

With a large outdoor terrace and spectacular views of the Quayside, it isn’t hard to see why it’s so popular. As well as serving delicious locally sourced food and drinks, the Hub also boats a merchandise shop, bike hire, maintenance workshops, film nights and breakfast clubs. Regular social bike rides take place on a weekly basis and are suitable for those new to cycling right through to professional riders.

Another city centre bike café opened its doors in June 2015. Part-funded by the Government in a bid to revolutionise cycling in the region, The Journey, located next to the Laing Gallery in the city centre is proving just as popular. Developed by travel charity Sustrans, in partnership with Newcastle City Council, its aim is to put city cycling back on the map to improve health and wellbeing.

Its cafe is run by Colour Coffee, which runs Pink Lane Coffee, and Recyke y’Bike who sell second hand bikes and carry out repairs across the North East.

Newcastle had £10.6m pledged to it by the Government as part of their Cycle City Ambition Fund which will go on schemes in the city’s West End, the Ouseburn, Heaton and the Coast Road.

Some £5.7m handed over in an earlier round of funding will go towards the John Dobson Street upgrade, part of Cowgate roundabout and Elswick and Benwell cycle lanes.

Peddalling Squares
Peddalling Squares in Swalwell

Across the Tyne in Swalwell is another contender for best bike café in the region, and some would even argue the country. Pedalling Squares is a family owned coffee bar and shop selling affordable replica and retro team cycling apparel. Since opening in March 2014, Pedalling Squares was voted in the top five cycling cafés in the UK by the Financial Times for 2016 and was in the top ten cycling cafés in the UK by cycling website, Road.cc for 2015.

The café is located on the Coast to Coast route, close to Derwent Walk and Chopwell Woods. Cyclists, runners and visitors alike can enjoy a coffee, cake and burger in unique, retro surroundings. Even dogs are welcome too.

For riders wanting to enjoy a more rural setting away from it all, Parkhead Station , near Stanhope on the Coast to Coast route provides beautiful scenery from all angles of Stanhope Moor.

Park Head Station
Parkhead Station near Stanhope in County Durham

Named after the railway stations that existed along the original railway line to Consett, Parkhead Station offers a bed and breakfast service as well as a rustic and inviting café for cyclists passing by.

Owners, Terry and Lorraine Turnbull decided for their millennium project to do something very different and Parkhead certainly was that.

The project was to restore and rebuild the derelict Station Master’s house into a B&B and team rooms. It has been specifically designed with cyclists and walkers in mind, renowned within the cycling fraternity and certainly the place to be on the famous Coast to Coast. It is frequently and affectionately referred to as the sanctuary, haven and oasis to many a weary, distressed traveller.

Coast loving cyclists can enjoy a brew at the Cullercoats Bike & Kayak. This venue hires out bikes, kayaks and stand up paddleboards for those feeling particularly adventurous. The team there are specialists in tours, lessons and repairs.

Bike and Kayak Cafe, Cullercoats
Bike and Kayak Cafe, Cullercoats

Cullercoats Bike & Kayak is a perfect retreat for aching legs and has converted a loft space into a cosy, snug café where guests can enjoy some homemade cake and locally roasted coffee.

On yer bike, you say? Yes please!

thecyclehub.org/

pedallingsquarescafe.com/

thejourneynewcastle.co.uk/

www.parkheadstation.co.uk/

cullercoatsbikekayak.co.uk/

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