Category Archives: Photographers

Adam finds passion and perspective in the ‘Lang Shot’

In our latest blog featuring North East artists and photographers DAVID SIMPSON talks to 44-year-old Gateshead-based photographer Adam Lang of Lang Shot Photography.

Boat By The Bridge by Lang Shot Photography
Boat By The Bridge by Lang Shot Photography

How would you describe your work?

Somewhere between city scapes and street photography, its constantly changing as I explore different types of photography.

Tell us how you first started out as an artist?

I bought a decent camera (Sony A5000) to take on a trip to Prague a few years ago. I took typical holiday snap shots with it and that’s as far as it went. Around 6 months later I started shooting pictures of the bridges around the Quayside.

When I figured out how to take long exposures I was hooked and spent many a morning wandering the streets of Newcastle when anybody with any sense was still in bed. I posted the results on my Facebook profile and got lots of praise from friends and family so I started a Facebook page to show my work, the reception was great and it just seemed to grow in no time at all.

Grey Street @ Dawn by Lang Shot Photography
Grey Street @ Dawn by Lang Shot Photography

What work are you most proud of?

That’s a difficult one. I’m normally proud of work that produces a style or mood that I’ve never done before. I’m very proud of my High Bridge shot, it gave me confidence to be different and was instrumental in developing my style.

High Bridge by Lang Shot Photography
High Bridge, Newcastle by Lang Shot Photography

What inspires you?

Comic book art and the look of film noir. My surroundings and the people around me are always inspiration, there is always beauty or a mood to be captured if you look.

Adam Lang photographed by Darren William Hall
Adam Lang photographed by Darren William Hall

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

Newcastle is such a photogenic city and is small enough to walk around. Living so close to Newcastle means there is always something for me to shoot. The people of the North East have been great in responding to my work, I’m not sure if it’s true of everywhere but the people from here love the area and seeing pictures of it in all its glory.

Autumn Quay by Lang Shot Photography
Autumn Quay by Lang Shot Photography

What has been your most challenging creation?

I’d say a shot of the Corn Exchange in Leeds. The place is huge and trying to capture the scale wasn’t easy. The end result is one of my favourite shots and went down great with the people of Leeds. I’ve used the same methods to create shots in Newcastle which captures the area in a way I haven’t seen too often.

Leeds Corn Exchange by Lang Shot Photography
Leeds Corn Exchange by Lang Shot Photography

Do you have any tips for up and coming photographers?

Take risks and don’t be afraid to fail. I was very close to not publishing a shot as I thought I’d maybe over processed it and would attract lots of criticism. I showed it to my father who said I should post it as it was interesting so post it I did.

The amount of likes it received was like nothing I’d seen before. A typical shot would attract a few hundred likes on Facebook, this one got two and a half thousand and was seen by around a hundred and fifty thousand people.

Which other artists or photographers inspire you?

There is a comic book artist/painter named Bill Sienkiewicz who I just love. The first time I saw his work was when I was around 13, it was a painted cover and the perspective and proportions didn’t seem to make sense but the mix of red and white in the painting was beautiful. I still love that cover and follow his work on Instagram religiously.

Swinging Bridge Sky by Lang Shot Photography
Swinging Bridge Sky by Lang Shot Photography

What are your ambitions for the future?

I’d love to make a living through my photography but not at the expense of my passion for it. I get so much enjoyment from shooting and processing my shots and I’d hate to lose that. I’ve had a few people asking me to teach them. This is something I’ll be looking at shortly. I’d eventually love a gallery or shop somewhere when the time is right.

The Theatre Royal by Lang Shot Photography
The Theatre Royal by Lang Shot Photography

Anything else you’d like to addd?

I’m always open to collaborations so get in touch if you have any ideas.

To see more of Adam’s fabulous photographs visit www.langshotphotography.com

See Adam’s work on Instagram at:

And on Facebook at:

 

Northumberland’s landscape and light make the perfect picture for David

In our latest interview featuring creative people in North East England we talk to Hexham-based landscape photographer and writer David Taylor. 

Charlies Garden. Photo David Taylor
Charlies Garden, Colywell Bay near Seaton Sluice, Northumberland. Photo by David Taylor

Where in the North East are you based?

I live in Hexham, just twenty minutes’ drive from Hadrian’s Wall Country.

How would you describe your work?

I’m a landscape and architectural photographer who lives and works in the north east of England. I’m particularly inspired by the Northumberland countryside, from the craggy landscape of Hadrian’s Wall to the wild moorlands of the Cheviot hills.

David Taylor North East photographer
David Taylor North East photographer

How did you get into photography?

I borrowed my school’s camera (and there was only one…) when I was studying A-Level art,  and was immediately hooked. There’s something compelling about making an image in a small fraction of a second without the need for pen or pencil! I’ve always liked being outdoors so landscape photography seemed the most natural fit.

What are you most proud of as a photographer?

I’ve written forty books and contributed to many others. These books have either been about photography techniques and equipment, or about Northumberland. I didn’t start out with the intention of combining writing with photography but I’m proud of the fact that I’ve achieved that.

Peel Crags, Hadrian's Wall. Photo David Taylor
Summer mist over Peel Crags, Hadrian’s Wall. Photo David Taylor

What do you most enjoy photographing and why?

Water in is a fascinating subject. How it appears in the final photo depends on a number of factors, such as how it’s illuminated to the length of exposure used. I could quite cheerfully spend all day just photographing watery subjects such as the sea.

What inspires you? 

The quality of light on a landscape. Light changes throughout the day, varying depending on where the sun is in the sky and the current weather condition. It means you can revisit the same location over and over again and still see and shoot something different each time. I find this both challenging – you can’t know precisely what will work and what won’t until you get to a location and see how it’s illuminated – and creatively inspiring.

Bamburgh Castle. Photo David Taylor
Bamburgh Castle. Photo David Taylor

What influence, if any does North East England have upon your work? 

I’m from Newcastle originally and grew up there. I spent a lot of time on the coast when I was young, as well as camping in places like Gosforth Park. That early exposure to the landscape of the North East is something that has been very influential. As much as I like travelling and visiting other parts of the world, I can’t see me wanting to stop photographing in and around the North East.

College Valley. Photo David Taylor
Looking down the College Valley, Northumberland. Photo David Taylor

What has been your most challenging photographic creation? 

I’m always a bit suspicious of photos that happen easily! They somehow don’t feel earned. It’s those images that require work or perseverance to achieve that tend to be my favourites. One shot – the view down Henhole in the College Valley in the Northumberland National Park – took six hours of trudging in rain across wet moorland to achieve. It was at the point that I was more than ready to go home that the sun finally broke out. The resulting photo took just a few minutes to set up and shoot, but this more than made up for the fact that I was soaking wet and still have a long walk ahead of me.

Do you have any tips for up and coming photographers? 

Photography has a reasonably steep learning curve but it’s not impossible to understand the basics of how an image is made. Once you’ve achieved this it’s just a question of practise to refine how and what you shoot. Be prepared to take creative risks and make mistakes; it’s often the mistakes you make that give you the greatest insight in how you can improve your photography. Don’t give up and have fun!

Footprints on Bamburgh beach. Photo David Taylor
Footprints on Bamburgh beach. Photo David Taylor

What other photographers or artists inspire you? 

Although he’s not a landscape photographer, Elliott Erwitt is one of my favourite photographers. His documentary photography is full of humanity and often wickedly funny. For me, there’s nothing better than curling up on a wet, grey day with one of his photography anthologies. I’ve tried to shoot like Erwitt and wasn’t that successful. It was a good indicator that I should stick to landscape…

What are your ambitions for the future? 

To keep on learning about photography. It’s such a big subject that’s impossible to know everything. It’s a worthwhile ambition to try though!

See more of David Taylor’s photography at: www.davidtaylorphotography.co.uk

 

Northumberland Snow. Photo David Taylor

The Beast from the East hits the Northumberland National Park. Photo David Taylor

 

 

 

Holy Island ‘paradise’ is an inspiration for Emma

DAVID SIMPSON speaks to Emma Rothera, a Holy Island-based award winning landscape and nature photographer. Part of our series of interviews focusing on creative talent in North East England.

Holy Island. Photo by Emma Rothera
Holy Island. Photographed by Emma Rothera

Tell us how you first started out as a photographer?

I went to Art College straight from School when I was 16 years old to study Graphic Design Communication and Photography.

What work are you most proud of?

My Holy Island portfolio of work  ‘A Journey of Light’

What inspires you?

Being out in the landscape and being privileged enough to witness nature during the most inspirational moments in time, first light, sunrise, sunset and last light, also the majestic golden hour.

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

It is just a completely magnificent canvas to work with, an area of outstanding natural beauty.

What has been your most challenging creation?

They are all challenging within there own right. Landscape photography tests the ability of a photographer on a daily basis as you are constantly working with mother nature and often unpredictable elements, so therefore much planning must take place.

Emma Rothera, photographer
Emma Rothera, photographer

Do you have any tips for up and coming artists or photographers?

You need to have a constant passion for what you do and be prepared for it to take a lot of hard work, inspiration and dedication to achieve your goals.

Which other artists or photographers inspire you?

There are many talented photographers in this world, a couple that inspire me are Charlie Waite and Ansel Adams.

What are your ambitions for the future?

To constantly push my boundaries to improve my photography and creativity further on a daily basis. I hope to offer further opportunities for learning to aspiring photographers through my workshops and discovery tours in the North East Region, predominantly the Northumberland Coastline and Holy Island. To produce further contributions to magazines and books and extend my portfolio of work. I hope to expand further commissions within the North East and in the UK, including Scotland and abroad.  I also hope to travel the world with my work in the future, photographing and writing as I go. I will always keep my base on Holy Island as this for me is paradise.

Bamburgh Castle by Emma Rothera
Bamburgh Castle. Photographed by Emma Rothera

To find out more about Emma, her inspirational photographs and her workshops visit Emma’s website at:

emmarotheraphotography.com

Twitter: @erotheraphoto 

Emma is a multi-award winning landscape and nature photographer. Accolades include:

2017 Winner of the ‘Creative Industries Award’ Northumberland Business Awards

2018 Shortlisted for the ‘Creative Industry Category’ Northumberland Business Awards

2016 Winner of the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Photography Award

2015 Landscape photographer of the week, worldwide@Landscape photography magazine.