Category Archives: North Tyneside

North East Quiz 4

More quiz questions to test your knowledge of North East England. The fourth  Northumberland and Durham History Quiz.

St Peter's church at Monkwearmouth, Sunderland
Quiz question 1,  Famous monastic site © David Simpson

1. What were the names and locations of the two monasteries founded by Benedict Biscop in the seventh century that were both associated with the famed monk and scholar, the Venerable Bede?

2. In medieval times these North East-based men with king-like powers could raise their own armies; appoint their own sheriffs and justices; administer their own laws; levy taxes and customs duties; create fairs and markets; issue charters; salvage shipwrecks; collect revenue from mines; administer the forests and mint their own coins. Who were they?

3. What was bred by the brothers Charles and Robert Colling of Ketton Farm near Darlington around 1796 and taken on a tour of the whole country?

The Durham Ox
Question 3. What was this called?

4. What was the Rookhope Ryde?

5. The first ever video to feature on MTV was written and performed by a musician from Houghton-le-Spring. What was his name, what was the song and what was his group called?

6. Which village near Ogle in Northumberland is noted for its annual summer time baal ceremony which dates back to pagan times?

7. What was the apparent true identity of James Drummond who worked as a ferryman on the River Wear at Fatfield near Washington from around 1746?

8. In 1031 who walked barefoot from the County Durham village of Garmondsway (near Coxhoe) on a pilgrimage to St Cuthbert’s shrine?

9. The historic town of Alston in the valley of the South Tyne is situated in which county?

Market Cross, Alston
Market Cross, Alston © David Simpson

10. William of Durham, the thirteenth century rector of Wearmouth was the founder of which esteemed educational institution?

11. Where will you find one of the oldest churches in Britain, built with stones from the nearby Roman fort of Binchester?

12. North Shields-born William Harbutt (pictured) is famous for inventing which malleable substance popular with children?

 

 

13. A staggering 130,000 turned out to see the Tyneside funeral of revered sportsman Harry Clasper in 1870. What was his sport?

14. What magnificent French chateaux style building opened near the County Durham town of Barnard Castle in 1892?

15. The ‘Sunday for Sammy‘ charity entertainment event commemorates the memory of which North East actor and musician?

16. Where would you find Blast Beach, Chemical Beach and Nose’s Point?

Blast Beach, Seaham
Blast Beach, Question 16 © David Simpson

17. Where in the North East can you find a Saxon church on a hilltop village with an extensive chemical works nearby?

18. What kind of ancient feature would you find at Whitley Castle in South Tynedale?

19. Which beautiful North East castle was described by William Shakespeare as a “worm-eaten hold of ragged stone”?

20. Which notable female campaigner for women’s rights who died in 1913 lived in the village of Longhorsley near Morpeth and what was her fate?

21. Wor Nanny’s a Maizor’, The Trimdon Grange Disaster, ‘The Oakey Strike Evictions’, ‘The Durham Strike’, ‘Stanla Markit’, ‘The Cat Pie’, ‘Sheeld Raw Flud’ and ‘Dorham Gaol’ were works by which North East songwriter, known as ‘the Pitman Poet‘?

22. What was the name of the Sir Walter Scott poem that alludes to the Teesdale area with lots of references to the dale’s Viking connections?

23. What monument was built to commemorate John George Lambton, the First Earl of Durham?

St. Andrew Auckland at South Church
South Church © David Simpson

24. What is the dedication of the church at South Church in County Durham?

25. Where might you be welcomed upon entrance by the 35 feet tall, ‘Tiny Tim’ weighing 90 tons?

26. Name the Dunston-born singer with rock band AC/DC?

27. Which York-born Sunderland MP was known as ‘The Railway King

28. Which Middlesbrough-born footballer and TV presenter’s father came from Sierra Leone?

29. Bruce’s Ladder, Gunner’s Pool, Black Bull’s Hole, Kissing Frog Stones, Devil’s Lapstone, Devil’s Bridge, Devil’s Scar, Seven Chambers and Pegjellimas Cave are all features in which North East beauty spot?

30. Who were the Votadini and the Brigantes?

31. Sportsman, Charles W. Alcock (pictured) who established the FA Cup competition and organised the world’s first international football and cricket competitions was born in which North East town?

32. Who and what features on the statue at the centre of Newcastle’s Old Eldon Square?

33. What is the name of the once-elusive particle predicted by the Nobel prize-winning Newcastle-born physicist Peter Higgs?

34. What did Mrs Clements of Durham City invent in 1720?

35. What does Bigg mean in relation to the name of Newcastle’s Bigg Market?

36. The song ‘My Grandfather’s Clock ‘ (1878), from which all long case clocks now take their name was inspired by a clock situated in an inn in which North East village?

Lindisfarne or Holy Island
Question 37 © David Simpson

37. What shocking event occurred in the year AD 793 that shook the region to the core and was supposedly preceded by ‘terrible portents’, that ‘sorely affrighted the inhabitants’?

38. Hairy Biker TV chef Si King was born in which North East village near Gateshead?

39. Which town is the North East birthplace of Monty Python comedian and actor, Eric Idle?

Bede's Tomb, Durham Cathedral
Galilee Chapel and tomb, Durham Cathedral. Question 40 © David Simpson

40. The prominent tomb of whom can be found in the Galilee Chapel of Durham Cathedral?

Answers below

 

Answers

  1. Wearmouth and Jarrow. Respectively the monasteries of St Peter and St Paul.
  2. The Prince Bishops of Durham.
  3. The Durham Ox (or Ketton Ox).
  4. A ballad that commemorates a raid by Tynedale mosstroopers on Rookhope in Weardale in the year 1569.
  5. Trevor Horn. The song was Video Killed the Radio Star and the group was called The Buggles.
  6. Whalton.
  7. He was the Earl of Perth, a Jacobite rebel in hiding.
  8. King Cnut.
  9. Cumbria.
  10. University College, Oxford.
  11. Escomb.
  12. Plasticine.
  13. He was a rower.
  14. Bowes Museum.
  15. Sammy Johnson.
  16. Seaham.
  17. Billingham.
  18. A Roman fort.
  19. Warkworth.
  20. Emily Wilding Davison. She was killed by the King’s Horse at the Epsom Derby.
  21. Tommy Armstrong.
  22. Rokeby.
  23. Penshaw Monument.
  24. St Andrew (St Andrew’s Auckland).
  25. Beamish Museum.
  26. Brian Johnson.
  27. George Hudson.
  28. Chris Kamara.
  29. Castle Eden Dene.
  30. Northern tribes in Roman Britain.
  31. Sunderland.
  32. St George and the Dragon.
  33. Higgs Boson particle.
  34. English style mustard.
  35. It’s a kind of barley.
  36. Piercebridge.
  37. The Viking raid on Lindisfarne.
  38. Kibblesworth.
  39. South Shields.
  40. The Venerable Bede.

Blessed with Beaches

When you’re out with a young teenage kid it’s hard to beat the beaches of the North East coast. DAVID SIMPSON explores some of the best beaches in our region.

Bamburgh Castle and beach,
Bamburgh Castle and beach © David Simpson

“Wow look at this view” you might hear me say as I drive through some lovely spot in the fabulous Northumberland and Durham countryside. My thirteen year old who says she loves it when I take her for drives in the countryside lifts her head, momentarily, from her phone, to see the lovely winding River Coquet up in the Northumberland dales, glistening in the summer sunshine. “That’s nice”, she says, before quickly returning to the engaging glow of that tiny screen.

Whitley Sands, Whitley Bay.
Whitley Sands, Whitley Bay © David Simpson

It’s hard to inspire young people about our region’s wonderful scenery but at least when I test her patience by leaping out of the car (parking up first) to take a quick snap of an interesting castle, village, dale or vale, she can still maintain the undisturbed contact with her digital world.

“Is it ok if I take a quick picture?” I ask, though the question is rhetorical, I’m going to take that picture.

“So long as I don’t have to get out of the car”, she sighs.

Now I’m not complaining. I remember a distinct lack of passion for endless nature, knowledge, views and visitor centres in the distant days of my own youth out on those long day trips with my mum and dad. My feelings of indifference weren’t that much different to what my daughter feels now and there were no digital distractions for us kids back then.

Whitley Bay
Whitley Bay, sandcastle sculpture by Richard Broiderick © David Simpson

Head to the beach though and things are quite different, just as I’m sure they were for me:

“Here dad can you look after my phone while I explore?”

The beach, I’ve found, is the best place to bond with the girl. It’s just unbeatable.

It’s not just about bonding with your kids though. I’m single and in my occasional, mostly unsuccessful, ventures into online dating I’ve discovered just about every lovely lady out there in our region declares an interest in their online profile for “exploring the Northumberland Coast”.

Dunstanburgh castle from the beach at Embleton Bay © David Simpson

There you’ll find it in profile after profile, like there’s some kind of hidden sponsorship deal. The coast is so predictably popular (though understandable given its ‘romantic’ beauty) that it makes me wonder how many couples wandering Amble, Alnmouth, Bamburgh, Beadnell, Whitburn, Whitley or wherever are only recently acquainted courtesy of findyournortheastcoastmate-dot-com if there’s such a thing.

Beautiful Bamburgh.
Beautiful Bamburgh © David Simpson

Anyway, I digress. When I’m out with the teenager the beach is a definite best choice and there are so many to choose from. I only see her properly at weekends every couple of weeks and during this glorious summer or even back in the winter, we have often ended up strolling along one of the region’s beautiful beaches.

Beach at Seaburn / Roker
Beach at Seaburn – Roker  © David Simpson

Our coast really is stunning and not just in Northumberland. The beaches and coastline north and south of the Tyne as well as along the Durham coast or around the cliffs of Cleveland are all different and simply marvellous in so many ways.

So far this year we’ve done Marsden, Whitley Bay, Whitburn,  Seaburn, Saltburn, Tynemouth, Alnmouth, Bamburgh, Druridge Bay then Seaham, Seahouses, Seaton Carew and Crimdon and of course we’ve found the rocky shorelines around places like Craster or the Cleveland cliffs just as appealing. Some days were sunny, some days were winter grey and grim, but it never seems to spoil the fun.

Seaburn, Sunderland during the 2018 Tall Ships race.
Seaburn, Sunderland during the 2018 Tall Ships race © David Simpson

You don’t have to spend lots of money to enjoy our splendid coast. Just take a packed lunch, though I admit a lovely fish shop, café or perhaps enjoying a bite on the beach with table service from Riley’s Fish Shack at bustling Tynemouth or an enormous ‘posh’ fish finger sandwich at the Marsden Grotto pub can be part of the delight.

Simply pottering about just seems to pass the time when I’m with the girl. This delighted beach dad can enjoy the views and take the occasional snap shot of spectacular scenes, passing ships or shapely sea shells but is just as happy gathering together a collection of countless coloured stones to make a mosaic on the beach or searching for crabs and limpets in a rock pool.

The North East coast simply rocks
The North East coast simply rocks and is never more than a stone’s throw away © David Simpson

The girl loves this kind of thing too or perhaps just writing her name or mine or her mum’s in huge letters in the sand. It’s good simple fun and so too is ‘plodging in a pool’, to use a North East phrase.

My daughter found a nice pool formed by one of those huge concrete cubes, designed to keep the Germans out, though in fairness I saw no beach towels here. This was on the beach at Alnmouth and she was strangely engrossed by that pool. A great place for her to test her briefly reclaimed phone’s waterproof photography credentials (it fortunately passed), before it was returned to me and forgotten again.

Whichever beach you choose, simply wandering along the shoreline with the mesmerising sound of crashing waves is just so peaceful and life affirming and if there also happens to be an extraordinarily majestic giant sand castle called Bamburgh looming in the distance, well that’s just a bonus.

Now we’re not going to choose a favourite beach or coastal spot because, well, we couldn’t possibly be forced into any particular coastal corner. They’re all so different anyway with their own individual charms, so I’ll start by mentioning the last beach we visited at Alnmouth.

View of Alnmouth
View of Alnmouth © David Simpson

We do love Alnmouth. So often people comment on how pretty it seems from the passing car as they head north along the coastal route but if you take a right turn and actually get out and explore this place it really is rather charming.

River meets the sea at Alnmouth
River meets the sea at Alnmouth © David Simpson

Park up near the golf course to the north but watch out for golf balls. From here you can wander south along the beach, which then continues slightly inland along the little estuary of the River Aln itself and then onwards into the harbour with its moored up boats. From there you can wander into the delightful little village of Alnmouth itself – or is it, perhaps, a very tiny town?

Incidentally, my favourite fact about Alnmouth is that it was once fired upon by American privateer John Paul Jones during the American War of Independence when he came by in his passing warship. The cannonball missed the village church , bounced a couple of times and hit a farm building. Nobody was harmed.

Down at Saltburn in the far south of the region (a part of Yorkshire we especially love) there’s a slightly stony stream that cuts across the beach to enter the sea where you can roll up your trousers, take off your socks and shoes and plodge across. Ah, the simple pleasures!

Saltburn.
Saltburn © David Simpson

Here at Saltburn the daughter and I spent quite a lot of time at the end of the pier just watching kids effortlessly catching crabs in nets on long fishing lines dropped into and raised from the sea below. The daughter was delighted when she spotted a curious whiskered seal that popped its head out of the water to watch a couple of kids paddle by in a dinghy.

Saltburn Pier.
Saltburn Pier © David Simpson

The sands of Northumberland’s Druridge Bay at five miles long are a delightful find that are perhaps not so well-known. They’re relatively sedate, quite different to the buoyant beaches of say Whitley Bay or South Shields to the south. Part of a country park, Druridge Bay has the added bonus of the lovely Ladyburn Lake, a substantial freshwater lake to the rear of the Druridge dunes.

Druridge Bay
A grey day won’t stop play at Druridge Bay © David Simpson

Tynemouth and Cullercoats are always firm favourites and justifiably popular. Whitley Bay looked lovely and lively in the sunshine on our recent visits even before they reopened the beautiful, elegant revamped Spanish City.

St Mary's Island near Whitley Bay.
St Mary’s Island near Whitley Bay © David Simpson

We love the sandcastle sculptures there which are quite quirky and as for St Mary’s Island, I’m sure it’s been said so many times before but it’s simply picture postcard perfect.

Marsden Bay near South Shields.
Marsden Bay near South Shields © David Simpson

South of the Tyne, Marsden Bay is still a great spot and the novelty of the lift down the cliff to the grotto pub and beach below never loses its simple appeal.

Further south, Sunderland is a city of super beaches which are always good for a wander. We recently walked down from wonderful Whitburn to Seaburn and Roker during the Tall Ships Race as the ships headed out to sea and it was certainly a serene sight to see.

Crimdon Beach
Crimdon beach looking towards Hartlepool and the distant cliffs of the Cleveland coast beyond © David Simpson

The Durham coast, once shunned by tourists for its industrial blight of now distant times has emerged as a new jewel following decades of intensive clean up and has several smashing beaches to explore. Many are still largely unknown even to residents of that county.

The unique terrain and natural environment formed by the meeting of the Magnesian limestone and the sea  makes the Durham coast a special spot for nature especially when coupled with the beautiful neighbouring wooded denes that are a regular feature of this particular coast.

The town of Seaham Harbour has seen a stunning transformation and despite the rather industrial names of two of its  beaches –  ‘Blast Beach’ and ‘Chemical Beach’, –  the names are in fact quite misleading as it is nature that now rules.

Blast Beach, Seaham
Blast Beach, Seaham © David Simpson

Speaking of jewels you may find pretty gems of many colours washed up on a beach here at Seaham. These wave-weathered, smooth, rounded pieces of glass were discarded into the sea by a Victorian glass works that once stood hereabouts and create a delightful little treasure to hunt for if you know where to look.

Indeed the whole North East coast could be described as a wonderful gem in itself. I’m always flabbergasted to hear even the best-known beaches of our region described as ‘the best-kept secret’.  For me and my girl it’s no secret at all, the North East coast is our familiar friend and a place where happy memories are made.

External sites:

Northumberland Coast AONB:

http://www.northumberlandcoastaonb.org/

Durham Heritage Coast: 

www.durhamheritagecoast.org/

A North East Beach Guide:

www.thebeachguide.co.uk/north-east-england

England Coast Path: 

England Coast Path North East

Twenty North East villages

DAVID SIMPSON explores twenty different villages across the region including some hidden away inside our North East towns.

The bridge at Blanchland
Blanchland © David Simpson

There are hundreds of fascinating and often beautiful villages of all kinds, scattered around the North East of England from the Tweed to the Tees Valley. Most people live in the cities and towns of course and there are some spectacular towns too, but we shouldn’t forget our villages. There are villages in every corner of our region, all the way from the upland country to the coast. They’re not just out in the country though, you’ll, even find some old villages hidden away within our towns and cities.

Piercebridge
Piercebridge village, on the Durham (Darlington) side of the Tees © David Simpson

Old cottages, medieval churches, a village green and perhaps a duck pond are features often associated with older villages and of course for many the focal point is the village pub. Here we thought we’d pick out twenty unusual, interesting and sometimes surprising villages, some of which you may be familiar with and others which you may not know. We are not saying these are the best ones or even necessarily the twenty most interesting ones but they give some impression of the great variety of villages that we have across our region.

Bamburgh

Northumberland

Okay, there will be very few who haven’t heard of this one, but to some extent Bamburgh is a little overlooked. It’s overlooked by Bamburgh Castle and so spectacular is that castle that it’s easy to forget how  beautiful the little village is too. Lovely little shops, pubs, people playing cricket or flying kites on the huge green below the steep craggy whin stone rocks of the castle. Not to mention the beach and the view. Views everywhere. Bamburgh is simply Britain at its best.

Bamburgh Castle and village
Bamburgh Castle and village © David Simpson

Read about Bamburgh

Norton-on-Tees

Teesside

Norton-on-Tees is a very substantial and beautiful village absorbed by neighbouring Stockton. It has a huge village green and a big duck pond. There are lots of old houses surrounding it and as if that wasn’t enough there’s Norton’s splendid Georgian High Street leading up to the green with its smart Georgian houses, pleasant shops and restaurants. Given its size and picturesque qualities Norton is surprisingly little known outside of Teesside. If it were part of London it would probably be rivalling the likes of Kew or Richmond and everyone would want to know about it. Oh and Norton also has a splendid Saxon church.

Norton High Street.
Norton High Street © David Simpson

Read about Norton

Craster

Northumberland

The ‘crow chester’ of old is a fabulous fishing village. Here rugged whinstone rocks form cosy coastal cottages in this delightful place famed for its kippers. For those who don’t know, the kippers are smoked on oak chippings to give them their distinct traditional flavour.

Craster © David Simpson

The big surprise at Craster is of course the neighbouring Dunstanburgh Castle – a magnificent and huge romantic ruin best approached by the walk from the village where visitors might follow in the footsteps of the legendary Sir Guy the Seeker.

Dunstanburgh Castle
Dunstanburgh Castle near Craster © David Simpson

Read about the Craster area

Brancepeth

County Durham

Small, but with picturesque rows of houses in what what was once the estate village for Brancepeth Castle. There’s no pub or village green here, so this is a place for people who like their villages tiny, secluded and quiet, though there is a busy road that passes straight through. The great medieval castle is still there alongside a charming medieval church though the castle has seen much restoration.

Brancepeth village.
Brancepeth Village, the north side © David Simpson

Read about Brancepeth

Bellingham

Northumberland

Bellingham, pronounced ‘Bellingum’ is the capital of North Tynedale in Northumberland and a great centre for exploring the area including the nearby Kielder Forest and reservoir. This is a relatively peaceful place with pleasant walks along the river. Nearby a walking route takes you to the lovely Hareshaw Linn waterfall. It’s so serene that it’s easy to forget that Bellingham was once entangled in the violence and bloodshed of the border wars in times gone by and was at the heart of ‘Border Reiver country’ with the dale being the lair of troublesome reivers like the Milburns, Robsons and Charltons of Tudor times.

Bellingham
Bellingham, North Tynedale © David Simpson

Read about Bellingham

Billingham

Teesside

Yes, Billingham. People have preconceptions about certain places and when we think Billingham we inevitably think of the vast chemical works with cooling towers and clouds of steam. Billingham has much earlier origins though and on the hill top at Billingham Green we find a few (and there are admittedly only a few) old cottages of the original village of Billingham dating back to times long past. The biggest surprise here, however, is a Saxon church dating to around 1000D. It’s about a hundred years older than Durham Cathedral.

Old houses in the village, Billingham Green.
Old houses in the village, Billingham Green © David Simpson

Near the edge of Billingham another little-known village is Cowpen Bewley near the estuarine industries of Teesside. Old cottages are set around a village green and you could easily be led to believe you were in an isolated rural spot miles away from any town or city if it were not for a sudden glimpse of the Middlesbrough Transporter Bridge in a gap between two cottages. It’s pronounced ‘Coopen’ by the way!

Ivy Cottage, Cowpen Bewley.
Cowpen Bewley © David Simpson

Read about Billingham and Cowpen Bewley

Wallsend

North Tyneside

Another one of those surprising villages hidden away within a town. Think Wallsend and you think of shipyards on the Tyne or the nearby Roman fort at the end of Hadrian’s Wall. Further north from the river though we find the old village of Wallsend Green and there’s quite an extensive green with old houses plus the nearby Wallsend Hall, a mansion of the late Georgian era. Wallsend has two old churches of note but these were built at a distance from the village. Wallsend’s medieval church of Holy Cross fell out of use with the Wallsend natives who used the local school for marriages for many years. It was only when the Bishop of Durham pointed out that the school was not consecrated and that their marriages and baptisms were not valid that they hastily built a new church dedicated to St Peter to the south towards Willington Quay.

Wallsend Village
Wallsend Green © David Simpson

Read about Wallsend

Holy Island Village

Northumberland

Holy Island Village on the island of Lindisfarne is something quite special, in fact ‘magical’ is perhaps the word. Charming houses and little shops with views of the rugged castle on Beblowe rock and the romantic ruins of Lindisfarne Priory. Given all the natural and historical charms of the island it’s easy to forget that it’s also the home to a rather picturesque little village too.

Holy Island Village
Holy Island Village © David Simpson

Read about Holy Island 

Whitburn

South Tyneside

Whitburn in South Tyneside close to the coast and near the northern fringe of Sunderland is a fabulous village with all kinds of interesting old buildings and the overall impression is delightful to the eye. The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner described it as “uncommonly attractive” in his famous guide books to the Buildings of England.

Whitburn village scenes
Whitburn village scenes © David Simpson

Whitburn has a thirteenth century church, some wonderful Georgian and Victorian houses, a curious cottage of red brick, a beautiful village green and even a windmill complete with sails. There are also literary links to Lewis Carroll who had relatives that resided here. The nearby village of Cleadon is also rather attractive and has links to Charles Dickens.

Read about Whitburn

Blanchland

Northumberland

Blanchland is situated in the Pennine dale of the Derwent in the south western area of Northumberland and is just over the border from County Durham. It is a rather exceptional and beautiful village constructed within the ruins of a medieval monastery. In Georgian times the charitable trust of Lord Crewe, a Bishop of Durham used stones from the abbey of Blanchland to construct a model village and the result is simply sublime. Highlights of the village are the L-shaped piazza,  the old monastery gatehouse, the abbey church and the lovely Lord Crewe Arms. Picturesque, it is almost a Hollywood producer’s vision of what an old English village should look like but very rustic, elegant and real.

Blanchland
Blanchland © David Simpson

Read about Blanchland

Sedgefield

Though it is arguably and technically a town, the large village green and Georgian cottages and village-type pubs that cluster around the green give Sedgefield an undoubtable village-like feel. There are some wonderful old Georgian houses and narrow lanes,  grander houses and interesting nooks clustered around the green. Our favourite story concerning Sedgefield concerns the ‘Pickled Parson’, a deceased vicar who was preserved in either salt or brandy by his good lady wife so she could avoid paying a particular tax.

Sedgefield
Sedgefield © David Simpson

Read about Sedgefield

Gainford

County Durham

Gainford is a very attractive former spa village near Darlington with a fine Jacobean hall. Situated on the River Tees its neighbours further downstream include High Coniscliffe, the ‘cliff of King Edwin’ and Piercebridge the site of a Roman fort and bridge that was once the home to a clock that inspired a famous song.

Gainford.
Gainford © David Simpson

Read about Gainford

New York

North Tyneside

I love the name of this one. There’s a New York Post Office and a New York Convenience Store. Several of the old mining villages across the region have some fabulous names: Pity Me, Quebec, Toronto, Philadelphia, Coronation, No Place. Many are tight knit neighbourly friendly communities often with fabulous scenery right on their doorstep. I live in a former mining village, so I know this for a fact.

New York, North Tyneside
New York, North Tyneside © David Simpson

Read about New York and North Tyneside

West Auckland

County Durham

Centred around a fine village green West Auckland is a former mining village that developed from an older village centre. Most people may know that West Auckland’s local football club won the world cup – twice. It’s commemorated by a sculpture at the centre of the green. There’s some interesting buildings of note here too. West Auckland’s Old Hall and the Manor House are both substantial buildings dating from the 1600s.

West Auckland Old Hall.
West Auckland Old Hall © David Simpson

Read about West Auckland

Heighington

Near Darlington

Once the capital of a district called Heighingtonshire in south Durham, Heighington near Darlington is a rather lovely village with a broad undulating green, a medieval church and lots of old interesting houses.

Heighington
Heighington © David Simpson

Read about Heighington

Beamish

County Durham

A small village, this is the original Beamish, near to the famous museum. We love the eye-catching figures on the Shepherd and Shepherdess pub and the former almshouses nearby. A fairly small village but still bigger than ‘Beamish Town’  that is found within the museum grounds.

Figures, Shepherd and Shepherdess Beamish village.
Figures, Shepherd and Shepherdess Beamish village © John Simpson

Read about Beamish

Whickham

Borough of Gateshead

Whickham village near Gateshead on Tyneside was at the heart of a major mining area from as early as the 1600s. The lovely stone houses of the 1700s around Church Chare, Front Street and Rectory Lane, are reminders of Whickham’s rural roots.

Whickham church
Whickham church © David Simpson

Read about Whickham

Hart

Situated on the magnesian limestone hills just outside Hartlepool with great views out to sea little Hart village was closely tied to Hartlepool and perhaps the capital of the ancient district called Hartness. There’s a beautiful little Saxon church, a windmill, an interesting couple of pubs and the scant remains of a medieval hall that belonged to the powerful De Brus (Bruce) family.

Hart village.
Hart village © David Simpson

Read about villages near Hartlepool

Staindrop

A substantial old village and a place of significance in medieval times, being the estate village of Raby Castle, the ancient stronghold of the Nevilles that is just along the road. The church of St Mary at Staindrop (once dedicated to St Gregory) is a sizeable and impressive medieval edifice with a core dating back to before the Norman Conquest.

Staindrop © David Simpson
Staindrop © David Simpson

Read about Staindrop

Backworth

Backworth mining village was perhaps made famous by the fictional character ‘Geordie Broon of Backworth’. There are some interesting old houses in the village but perhaps the biggest surprise is the Miners’ Welfare building in a beautiful stately hall that was purchased by the local mining community in the 1930s.

Backworth Hall.
Backworth Hall © David Simpson

Read about Backworth, North Tyneside

What’s your favourite North East village?

This is just a selection of North East villages and a bit of a random one at that. What’s your favourite village in the North East? How about Cambo or Lanchester, Norham on Tweed, Alnmouth, Elsdon, Ford and Etal or Longframlington? Maybe Castle Eden or Westoe, Rennington, Ellingham, Matfen, Shincliffe, Frosterley, Romaldkirk or perhaps the old village at Ponteland.

Let us know in the comments below what your favourite village is and why. If you’re on Twitter why not tweet  your favourite village especially if you’ve got some great photos to show it off. Tag us in on your tweet or visit our Facebook page. Details below:

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