Category Archives: Food and Drink

Local ales? A walk in the park!

HELEN GILDERSLEEVE goes for a walk in the park and discovers a rich trail of history rounded off with award-winning beer

The Wylam Brewery in Newcastle's Exhibition Park
The Wylam Brewery in Newcastle’s Exhibition Park

Park goers may have noticed a flurry of activity at the old Palace of Art in Newcastle’s Exhibition Park lately.

The much-loved park, used by runners, families and cyclists alike, is now home to  Wylam Brewery’s new HQ after they closed their doors at their old brew house in Heddon-on-the-Wall.

The Grade-II listed Palace of Arts building is now a fully operating, working brewery and events space having remained almost derelict for nearly a decade. The venue now boasts guided tours and a Grand Hall which plays host to brewers’ markets, live music, pop up events, weddings and more.

A venue for events
A venue for events

Ale lovers can sample freshly made brews such as the award winning Jakehead IPA as well as a variety of heritage cask and keg beers in quirky surroundings in the venue’s Brewery Tap.

Forthcoming events at Wylam Brewery include brewers’ markets, Craft Beer Calling, Battle of the Burger, movie screenings and live DJ sets and gigs.

The Palace of Art building is no stranger to glory and entertainment itself, being the last remaining building from the 1929 North East Exhibition.

The Exhibition was an ambitious project built to celebrate and encourage craft, art and industry at the start of the Great Depression. It was a symbol of pride and industrial success of the region as well as an advertisement for local industry and commerce.

The exhibition lasted 24 weeks and a total of 4,373,138 people attended. Gold watches were given to each one-millionth visitor and it closed on 26 October 1929 with an impressive fireworks display.

The North East Coast Exhibition, Exhibition Park 1929
The North East Coast Exhibition, Exhibition Park 1929

The Wylam Brewery building itself is steeped in history. Until 1983 a Science Museum was located in the venue which housed Turbinia, the first steam turbine-powered ship and the world’s fastest ship in its time (now located in the Discovery Museum in the city centre).  A military vehicle museum was then housed there from 1983 to 2006 and the building remained unused until the brewery took over this spring.

Exhibition Park has recently undergone a £3 million redevelopment funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. This included; installation of a new children’s play area and outdoor gym equipment, a new skate park, restoration of the bandstand, resurfacing of the tennis courts and new lighting and fencing.

Anyone joining me for a brew? Cheers!

For further information visit wylambrewery.co.uk

@wylambrewery

Beer lovers might also enjoy this beer blog from our fellow England’s North East contributor, Paul White

Sparkling future for Tyneside Cinema

Canopy of Lights in High Friars Lane
Canopy of Lights in High Friar Lane

HELEN GILDERSLEEVE discovers new light and a dash of continental style in a much loved corner of Newcastle

A gleaming canopy of lights and a Continental-style café and cocktail bar form part of new plans at Newcastle’s much loved Tyneside Cinema.

Plans were revealed in January showcasing the transformation of High Friars Lane, where the entrance to the cinema resides.

The hope is to give the once dreary alleyway a makeover with a full ceiling of sparkling lights in a bid to turn the area from grotty to grotto.

Hundreds of cinema lovers across the region have helped fund the cost themselves with the Tyneside’s Just Giving page appeal peaking at £4,990.

As well as the canopy of lights, the Tyneside recently opened the doors of its brand new café and cocktail bar Vicolo (meaning ‘alley’ in Italian- see what they did there?) The former Intermezzo bar has already received rave reviews from film, food and coffee lovers alike.

Vicolo’s relaxing, chic and continental ambience is inspired by chef Tom Adlam’s desire to create a foodie hang out which boasts unique treats like Vicolo’s own ice cream, ‘sandwiches by the inch’ and ethically sourced coffee.

The interior was created to look like it had evolved through time and the space takes references from Italian cafes, particularly those dating back to the 1930s, ‘50s and ‘60s with a retro stylish vibe.

Vicolo
Vicolo

Additional features to the outdoor area include; new signage to welcome visitors, the installation of bicycle racks and a new and extended pavement café.

The much loved art house cinema is no stranger to makeovers and has undergone huge interior changes in recent years, including a £1.3m redevelopment which led to the opening of an additional cinema screen and the ever popular Tyneside Cinema Bar Cafe in 2014.

Tyneside Cinema’s Head of Operations, Phillip Scales said “We are thrilled to be able to make this exciting transformation to High Friar Lane making it a safer and more welcoming place to visit. We have already had great feedback from our customers  and we hope that this will encourage many more people to find and enjoy what Tyneside Cinema has to offer as well as being of lasting benefit to the city centre.”

Tyneside Cinema is an independent cinema in Newcastle and the city’s only cultural cinema that specialises in the screening of independent film and world cinema.

For further details visit tynesidecinema.co.uk/food-drink/vicolo

Vicolo’s opening hours are 9am to 11pm on Sundays and 8am to 11pm Monday to Saturday.

@VicoloNewcastle

Beer Blessed

Beer Blogger, PAUL WHITE explores the region’s thriving range of craft beers and microbreweries

poetsdaypint

The North East is a fantastic place for food and drink.

We are blessed.

Whatever your culinary preference, there is something for you, and you no longer have to focus on Newcastle, and events like Eat! Great restaurants to suit all wallet sizes are now widespread across the region.

Likewise, we have some amazing drinks being produced in the North East, from Durham Gin to Wylam Brewery.

The craft brewing movement is as prolific here as it is anywhere. I use the term “craft”, because it is now in common usage, but many brewers will tell you that it has been around for years. Black Sheep Brewery, just a short drive south of the region, for example, will argue that what founder Paul Theakston was doing when he established the brewery in 1991 was craft – it was challenging bland beer.

People may look at the North East and think of our brown ales, from Newcastle and Sunderland (Double Maxim), but that’s just scratching the surface. Since I started my blog, Poets Day Pint, at the start of the year, I’ve blogged about a different beer most weeks and, both “professionally” and socially, I’ve sampled 67 different beers (source: my Untappd app, with which I check-in with each beer – correct at time of writing, almost certainly out of date at time of reading).

Many of these have been from the North East and I’ve found some fantastic beer. Wylam’s Jakehead IPA has become a go-to beer, I’ve found a lovely lemon and vanilla oatmeal stout from Northern Alchemy, I’ve rediscovered the joy of Camerons’ Strongarm, and stumbled into the Black Paw Brewery to sample its range, which is now matched with the outstanding food at the Michelin-starred Raby Hunt restaurant.

This is just a flavour, with microbreweries seemingly to be found in every town and village.

My urge to you, dear reader, is to give these beers a try, whether you see them on a bar, in a pub fridge, or in a supermarket. If you’re passing a local brewery, stop to see if it’s open. It may be selling its drinks, or even giving tours.

There’s a joy to be had in finding a new beer. It’s even better if you know it’s locally produced and that, simply by choosing it over a mass-produced generic “name”, you’re helping the local community and a small business.

Visit Poets Day Pint, a jargon free beer blog for the layman, not the drayman.