Category Archives: Artists

Joanne’s colourful, quirky seaside scenes will make you smile

In our latest interview featuring creative people in the region we talk to 40-year-old Ouseburn-based artist Joanne Wishart.

Newcastle-based artist. Joanne Wishart
Newcastle-based artist. Joanne Wishart

Where in the North East are you based?

My studio is based at the Mushroom Works in Ouseburn, Newcastle, but I live a little nearer the coast in North Shields.

How would you describe your work?

My work is colourful and quirky capturing nostalgic seaside memories of days out at the coast, in particular the North East coast. I have an extensive back catalogue of works depicting Northumberland’s favourite coastal landmarks. I like to paint summer days and sunny skies to create images that will give you a lift and make you smile.

Seaside Donkeys by Joanne Wishart
Seaside Donkeys by Joanne Wishart

I work mainly with acrylic paint but I like to add a bit of collage material including fabrics and old maps into my work to give added layers and a textured surface.  My ideas have developed over the years and have introduced new work including driftwood boat sculptures, and deckchair artworks.

Tell us how you first started out as an artist?

I’ve always been creative ever since I was a child. Then after school I went on to study Printed Textile design at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, Dundee. As part of my degree I spent a term in Nova Scotia studying at their art college, which was a fabulous experience.

I would say the progression form graduation to where I am today was a slow process, I initially got work freelancing for agents in the U.K. and New York designing Hawaiian shirt prints and children’s furnishing fabrics. I also worked part time in a small gallery and picture framers. In 2006 I met my now husband and moved from Berwick upon Tweed to North Tyneside and together we set up our current business where we self publish my paintings into limited edition prints and greetings cards and we haven’t looked back.

Towards Dunstanburgh by Joanne Wishart
Towards Dunstanburgh by Joanne Wishart

What work are you most proud of?

I do love the old 1940’s deckchair frames with my paintings on the canvas. They are something just a little bit different and really capture the essence of seaside nostalgia.

I am also proud to have won North East England’s “Best Creative Business” in 2009.  I am proud to be able to make my way in the world doing what I love for a living.

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

Growing up near Berwick upon Tweed and now living in North Tyneside, North East England has so much to offer in terms of inspiration.

 What inspires you?

I love the great outdoors, the beauty of the North East coastline, the coastal landscape, the sun, the sea, the flowers and animals. Most of my inspiration comes from walking the coastal paths or spending a sunny day on the beach with my kids. I like to get out and about with my sketchbook and camera, taking it all back to my studio with a head full of ideas.

Puffins by Joanne Wishart
Puffins by Joanne Wishart

What has been your most challenging creation?

My most challenging creation has to be my exhibition in the Bridge Gallery at Tynemouth station. It is such an unusual space to hang work in and that can be view from both sides of the walkway. I am used to hanging a painting on a flat wall so I had to think differently to make this exhibition work as a whole.

 Do you have any tips for up and coming artists?

My tips would be to work hard, create your own style, evolve and develop. Go into galleries and ask for feedback (make an appointment first, you will get a better response!), learn from this and don’t let the knock backs get you down.  An artist’s life is a rollercoaster and you never know what is around the next corner.

Joanne Wishart, artist
Joanne Wishart, artist

Which other artists or photographers inspire you.

I try not to get too inspired by other artists work so that my own signature style develops. 

What are your ambitions for the future?

I would love to run my own studio gallery one day, this might be when my kids get a bit older, but for the moment I am happy juggling being a mum and artist.

If you would like to visit my studio at the Mushroom Works and see where the magic happens please pop along to Ouseburn Open Studios on the 30th June & 1st July.  The Mushroom Works will be open to the public and welcomes visitors behind the scenes. I will have a selection of new North East paintings on show in the Mushroom Works gallery and will be on hand to talk to anyone in my studio.

Discover more ofJoanne’s art at : www.joannewishart.co.uk

‘Oot on the streets’ with Peter for a touch of nostalgia

We talk to Newcastle artist Peter Davidson as part of our series of interviews featuring artists, photographers and creative people in the North East. Peter’s work is filled with nostalgia and humour that reflect the streets and communities of the region in times past.

Peter Davidson 'The Gas Tank Derby'
Peter Davidson ‘The Gas Tank Derby’

How would you describe your work?

My work is very much nostalgia based with a touch of humour, “oot in the back streets as a young un” I try to remind people that the stereotypical view of our great region isn’t all true. There was great fun, love, friendship and laughter growing up in those much simpler times.

Newcastle artist Peter Davidson
Newcastle artist Peter Davidson

Tell us how you first started out as an artist?

Although always good as a child at art I did nothing with it and went off to work as a teenager, I eventually ended up in heavy industry. I started drawing again in my early 40s for pure fun, when I was made redundant from Alcan (aluminium smelter)  I decided to give it a go properly.

Which work are you most proud of?

I think the fact that as a self taught artist what makes me most proud is the joy I bring to people through my work, coupled with the achievement of my work reaching a high enough standard to be hung in many high end galleries all over the country

What inspires you?

My inspiration to paint is driven by my constant desire to improve my skills and knowledge with every single painting I do, I don’t want perfection, that’s boring, but I want everyone to see the best that I can do.

Peter Davidson 'The Beardsley Step Over'
Peter Davidson ‘The Beardsley Step Over’

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

The passion of us Geordies has a big influence on my work, whether it be football, mucking around in the back lane, getting into trouble with Mam and Dad or looking out for each other.

What has been your most challenging creation?

My most challenging creation is more than a particular painting, when I signed up with a publishing house 18 months ago my work had to “go up a level”.

“The ability is there” my publisher said, but now my competition is at a much higher level. The step up to be at that standard is most challenging and rewarding. So, my next painting is always my most challenging creation.

Do you have any tips for up and coming artists?

My best tip is to never be afraid to fail, never be put off by rejection, believe in yourself and push your talent to its absolute maximum.

Peter Davidson 'Away Days'
Peter Davidson ‘Away Days’

Which other artists or photographers do you admire?

I like and admire the artwork of Frank Miller, the american comic book writer and film producer, although his work has very little in common with mine, McKenzie Thorpe and Bob Barker are also artists I admire.

What are your ambitions for the future?

My ambition for the future is very simple really, make the next painting better than the last painting, it’s my driving force, the rule I set myself. I may not always achieve it, but like I said earlier, never be afraid to fail trying.

See more of Peter Davidson’s work at:

peterdavidsonart.gallereo.com

Treasure troves of the coast an inspiration for Kate

An interview with Durham-based artist, Kate Van Suddese. Kate describes how she is inspired by the North East coast and the different artists who have influenced her work and passion. Part of a continuing series exploring the work of artists, photographers and other creative people in the North East.

'Sea Kiss' by Kate Van Suddese. Depicts the rocks at Marsden Bay.
‘Sea Kiss’ by Kate Van Suddese. Depicts the rocks at Marsden Bay.

How would you describe your work?

It’s hard to define my work as I have changed so much over the years both in style and subject. I have sold my work professionally for over 30 years and in such a timescale things change drastically in every way or I feel they should do!  Always learning, always growing, always changing, always new things to see and paint.!

To give a recent point of focus I would say I have been a seascape artist for the longest time. Back when I was younger I painted portraits and then went on to large abstract paintings that were purely involved with colour and form. I loved Cezanne and Rothko at the time and they influenced me a great deal.

'City Life' Kate Van Suddese, the Gateshead Millennium Bridge.
‘City Life’ Kate Van Suddese, the Gateshead Millennium Bridge.

Tell us how you first started out as an artist.

I first started out after Uni in my early 20s painting portraits. I worked lots of part time jobs to keep funds going so I could paint. I dropped in and out of Art degrees and courses as the mood took me, travelled around a few places. Always painting and always trying to get my work into galleries etc. and always working if I ran out of cash. Eventually I built up a selection of galleries who exhibited my work nationally including the Biscuit Factory, Red Rag Gallery, the Leith gallery. And things went on from there.

Kate Van Suddese
Kate Van Suddese

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

In 1993 my mother died and it had a profound effect on my painting world. I began to paint the coastal world around me. It was a place where I found peace and the raw energy and sense of limitless space was comforting. A bridge to another world.

Mum loved the North East coast and I found myself wandering around in her footsteps, reliving the childhood memories I had of days at the beach with my family. I ended up painting a whole series of seascapes featuring huge crashing waves and local landmarks all with a link in my mind to my mother and my family.

From then on I have been painting my beloved Northern coastline in all its glory as a tribute to both my mum and the whole Northern ethos.

Warmth, family, roots, history: who cannot but be inspired by our beautiful coast? The variety and breadth of the coast from Redcar up to Amble etc and beyond is amazing.  The beauty and wide expanse of beach and white light of Bamburgh is just breathtaking. Both Lindisfarne and Dunstanburgh with their history and isolation are magnets for people seeking open space and a sense of belonging.

When you see the regeneration of the coal coast it just astounds with the changes that have happened over recent years. There are still the scars of the mining industry within its folds but the beaches and coastal paths are now well on their way to their own form of well-hewn beauty. Its good to keep a sign of past times too, to remember life as it was. I spend a fair bit of time at Blast Beach , Seaham, looking for glass from the old glass works and painting the crashing waves at Noses Point.

I spend every weekend at Tynemouth Market with my paintings and prints and have come to love the coast in the area. I set off early to watch the early sun from different vantage points before I go to work at the market.  Sitting watching the early waves come in at North Shields fish quay and the Groyne is One of the most peaceful and happy things I like to do. It never fails to make me want to paint it.

Kate Van Suddese's 'Treasures Hunters' depicts the fabulous market at Tynemouth.
Kate Van Suddese’s ‘Treasures Hunters’ depicts the fabulous market at Tynemouth.

All the way along, St Edwards Bay, Longsands and our magnificent St Mary’s Lighthouse is a treasure trove of inspiration, both through memories of times past and present day happiness. In rain or shine, calm or storm.

I paint in lots of different styles, it depends on how I feel at the time and what the image needs. But mainly I am an oil painter, using canvases both tiny and large.

I adore Turner and Atkinson Grimshaw and much of my work has a feel to it of both. Its not deliberate, I just feel that my love of light and beauty is so ingrained that is just comes out as it does because that seems to be the only way I can try to capture what I want. Turner’s use of light and colour and almost abstract form was far advanced for the time and seems to me to just capture the essence of another world with its sense of beauty and translucence.

'In The Soft Light of Morning' St Mary's Lighthouse near Whitley Bay. Kate Van Suddese.
‘In The Soft Light of Morning’ St Mary’s Lighthouse near Whitley Bay. Kate Van Suddese.

In painting local landmarks and local seas I also wanted to find a way to paint beauty, as to me the sense of place and belonging is a link to love and life.

I try to find the beauty in whatever it is that has inspired me to pick up my brush and paint it.

As I said the focus of my work is mainly as a seascape artist but recently I have enjoyed creating small series of fantasy works. All have to be beautiful in one way or another though. Story telling is something I like to do and to tell a story with a painting is a satisfying way of making magic from nothing.

'Night Life'. The Tyne Bridge, Kate Van Suddese.
‘Night Life’. The Tyne Bridge, Kate Van Suddese.

What inspires you?

Everything inspires me. The world around me, words , poems, colours, stories, memories, sadness,happiness, my family, my love of the sea and my love of the North and its history and encompassing nature.

Which other artists or photographers do you admire?

Turner for his love of light. The Pre-Raphaelites for their love of romance and magic. Monet for his colour and expression. Charles Napier Hemy for the sea and motion. Norman Cornish for my Grandad who was a miner. Vuillard because everything he does is so beautiful. Jeremy Mann breathtaking. Berthelsen for his warmth like being wrapped in a blanket. Dame Laura Knight for memories and sunlight

'The Sunshine Bay', Cullercoats. Kate Van Suddese.
‘The Sunshine Bay’, Cullercoats. Kate Van Suddese.

Do you have any tips for up and coming artists?

Be yourself, paint what you want  and keep experimenting and changing.

Decide which way you want your career to go, what is the most important thing and go for it . find which side of the fine line between Art and Commerce it is that motivates you and make your choices accordingly. Its hard being an artist for the love of it if you cant make enough money to buy paint and pay your bills.  Just keep going and don’t let the knock s set you back, there will always be someone who loves your work  and someone who doesn’t.

Roker Lighthouse. Kate Van Suddese.
Roker Lighthouse. Kate Van Suddese.

What has been your most challenging creation?

My most challenging creation hasn’t happened yet. Everything is hard, I call it a bitter sweet occupation, the love and pain involved in creating anything is all encompassing whether it is 2D or 3D, for yourself or a commission.

What are your ambitions for the future?

As far as ambitions for the future goes: I just want to paint!

See more of Kate’s work www.katevansuddese.com