All posts by Helen Gildersleeve

Laughter is just the tonic

Last weekend saw the second instalment of Jason Cook’s Comedy Club at Wylam Brewery’s Palace of Arts. HELEN GILDERSLEEVE caught up with some of the stars of the show.

Wylam2
Wylam Brewery

Another sold out evening where ales were flowing gave the distinctive and airy venue a buzzing atmosphere. The evening was compered flawlessly by popular Hebburn actor and Geordie Rat Pack member, Steffen Peddie, who had the audience in stitches with his accounts of him monumentally peeing someone off at the Tyne Tunnel change machine, explaining why Slimming World coaches are evil and the highs (and lows) of memory foam mattresses.

steffenpeddie
Compere Steffen Peddie

First up was local lad, John Fothergill, who entertained us all with his dry and sarcastic accounts of life in London as a Geordie. A regular at the Comedy Store, Fothergill’s style is original as he moves from embarrassing sexual revelations to mocking his rural upbringing in Crawcrook.

John Fothergill
John Fothergill

Next on stage was Steve Day who brought a totally unique performance and shared witty observations of being a deaf man in a hearing world. He claims to be the only deaf comedian, and if there are others he hasn’t heard of them. Steve wasn’t born deaf but lost his hearing when he was a teenager, he explains: “I was about 18. They don’t know the cause, something that used to frustrate me, but I’ve learned to look forward not backwards”. His rants are enjoyable; especially a story about a Paralympics event he attended that showed Boris Johnson’s true colours. He educates the audience to the hilarity of deaf person snobbery, claiming people who were born deaf believe they are superior to him which he simply rolls his eyes at. Being a deaf comedian is great anyway he claims in conclusion, because you can never hear if anybody is heckling.

Steve Day
Steve Day

Headliner of the night was Edinburgh dwelling Canadian funny man, Tom Stade. Relatively famous on the comedy circuit, Stade has appeared on the likes of Michael McIntyre’s Comedy Roadshow and Live at the Apollo as well as The Comedy Store and various comedy festivals.

He literally bounds onto the stage with endless energy and his performance was met with raucous laughter almost immediately. It’s impossible not to find this man funny.

His observations of quirky British habits were cleverly delivered, ranging from our obsession with buying flights for £29.95 regardless of the destination to his confusion of how we happily spend £3 on lattes (and physically demonstrated how we get sexually molested financially by coffee chains) yet are obsessed with Primark bargains and are all tight arses. British TV is also the butt of many jokes as he asks the simple question of why people would go on Cash in the Attic. The highlight of his set had to be his impressions of coffee chain adverts if they existed including “Starbucks is where you can meet a new friend” and “Nero is where you go when the others are closed”.

Tom Stade with Helen Gildersleeve
Tom Stade with Helen Gildersleeve

I caught up with him after the show quickly and it’s apparent his magnetic energy isn’t just a stage act. He told us how he simply loves what he does and can’t understand how all these young folk want photos with him as he’s uncool and doesn’t even know what Snapchat is. Its ok Tom, I don’t either. But thanks for the photo.

The 350 strong crowd left the brewery in better spirits than when they arrived, and not just from the tasty beer on tap. I think this event has already become a regular calendar filler for many locals and it’s clear Cook skilfully selects the slickest of comedians and the range is always eclectic, varied and well, funny. I can’t wait for the next one.

Jason Cook

www.jasonlovescomedy.com

www.wylambrewery.co.uk

Review: Hops and hysterics at Wylam Brewery

HELEN GILDERSLEEVE attends the debut of Jason Cook’s Comedy Club on a Saturday evening. A sell out event that proved hops and hysterics are truly a winning combo.

Jason Cook's Comedy Club
Jason Cook’s Comedy Club

It isn’t long since the popular Wylam Brewery Palace of Arts opened its grand doors less than a year ago. Since then the brewery has hosted many successful events, quickly becoming a venue etched firmly in the social calendars of many locals.

Around 350 laugh seekers headed to the brewery on what was a freezing, depressing night and it’s fair to say it was definitely worth the trip.

Cook, writer of the popular Hebburn series on BBC 2 invited a trio of comedians including local lads Gavin Webster and Carl Hutchinson as well as Canadian headliner Phil Nichol.

The Wylam Brewery in Newcastle's Exhibition Park
The Wylam Brewery in Newcastle’s Exhibition Park

The night was compered flawlessly by Cook who dropped in comical anecdotes throughout of kinky mishaps with In the Night Garden toys and mocking phone users in the audience.

Gavin Webster
Gavin Webster

First up on stage was special guest Gavin Webster who had everyone in fits with his account of Geordies being so hard they single-handedly stopped anyone attacking Hadrian’s Wall and beyond. His hilarious take on the Glasweigan accent also went down a storm.

Carl Hutchinson
Carl Hutchinson

Next up was the mightily-pee’d-off-with-life-and-everything-it-entails Carl Hutchinson. Sharing his witty accounts of why he despises vegetarians right down to an account of why he’d strategically jump off a bridge in rush hour and give Games of Thrones spoilers to the general public, Hutchinson is definitely one to watch on the national comedy scene.

Surprise guest of the night was Canadian, London dwelling, funny man Phil Nichol. Who one can only describe as completely off his rocker. In the best way possible.

Phil Nichol
Phil Nichol

His act started off lightly with some great comparisons between Canadians and Cockneys, then quickly transcended into a potty-mouthed, guitar playing frenzy. Songs were littered with below the belt blinders and material that would make your mother blush. His act ended with him stripping half naked and being carried through the crowd by a guest he’d befriended. Not a single person could have kept straight-faced if they tried.

Cook certainly exceeded all expectations for his first stab at a gig here and it’s easy to see that the next shows will be definite sell outs. The Wylam beer fresh from keg to cup was an added bonus, I was a particular fan of the aptly named Keep Taking the Plsner.

If it’s laughs you’re after in a unique venue then you should definitely come along to the next one; a superb evening out.

The next comedy club is on 1 April and features Tom Stade and John Fothergill. Tickets can be purchased here: www.ticketweb.co.uk/event/268761

@wylambrewery

@jasonmarkcook

@philnichol

@CPHutchinson

@Thegavinwebster

Taking a step back in time in Newcastle

HELEN GILDERSLEEVE checks out Newcastle’s vintage clothing shops and speaks to the owners of two of the city’s favourite retro stores that sell popular fashions from times past.

TheYestSociety3

It’s always fun to look back nostalgically at the bygone eras, making it easy to see why vintage clothing has had a recent popularity spike. Due to the success of genre films and shows like the Great Gatsby, La La Land, Downton Abbey and Mad Men, or maybe people just wanting a change from generic high street land, it seems retro rags are here to stay (although I’m still freaked out that my teenage wardrobe is now classed as retro).

Vintage clothing has a quality that transcends time and it’s easy to get a hold of some quirky buys right on your doorstep. I spoke to the owners of two of the city’s favourite retro shops: Flip on Westgate Road and The Yesterday Society in the Grainger Market.

Flip (104 Westgate Road)

flipstorenewcastle

Importing genuine American clothing makes Flip’s style stand out from any other vintage shops. Owner, Nick Woods, took over the business from his father who founded the shop 40 years ago making it Newcastle’s longest standing retro clothes store. Flip has been importing clothes from across the pond since 1978 and has built a strong reputation locally amongst young and old.

Overhead speakers coax customers into the shop with bassy electronica, rhythm and blues and Americana rock. The entrance is a narrow, poster-adorned corridor which works as an acoustic funnel.

On entering the store, everything at Flip has its own appropriate section; not one shirt was out of place nor a crease apparent in any of the Levi 501 jeans. The Springsteen vibe meant there were even sections for cowboy bootlace ‘bolo’ ties and original Ball Mason jars- perfect for moonshine quaffing.

Flip1

Nick said every time he receives a shipment from the USA, it’s incredibly exciting as he has no idea what he will get. Most recently he found retro American style metal signs, which went for sale on their eBay shop. Overall, Flip has a clear identity and is well worth visiting for a step back in time and to find something a little different.

Tell us a bit about Flip and what you sell?

We’ve been in business since 1978, we’ve been importing genuine American clothing ever since and have built a strong identity and reputation in the North East. We sell shirts, coats, leather jackets, retro signs, t-shirts, sweatshirts, denim and lots more pieces of classic Americana.

Flip, in Newcastle's Westgate Road
Flip, in Newcastle’s Westgate Road

What sells the best?

This tends to change all the time but we’ve noticed US printed sweatshirts, denim jackets and flannel shirts always seem to do consistently well.

Do you think Newcastle has a good selection of vintage stores?

Right now there’s only a few as there’s been some recent vintage clothing shop closures. We tend to help each other out by sending trade to each other if we don’t stock certain items customers are looking for.

Why do you think vintage clothes have made a recent comeback?

I think vintage clothing has always been in demand but at the moment we’ve noticed a lot more of the younger crowd taking a keener interest. A lot of people realise that classics never go out of fashion and it’s always good to see people embrace mixing the old with the new. I’d like to think another reason is that vintage has a positive environmental impact. You’re actively recycling whenever you buy vintage.

 

The Yesterday Society (Grainger Market)

TheYestSoc1

Neatly tucked away in Newcastle’s 180-year old Grainger Market alongside book and food stalls, The Yesterday Society is easily missed. It may have a limited amount of clothes with it being a small space but with good pricing and a great selection of old school items, they certainly make up for it with quality. It’s like a Pandora’s Box of unique and quirky items; the stall is tastefully adorned and reminiscent of a backstage theatre in bygone Hollywood.

The owner, Rachael, is an enthusiast of all things vintage. Her range is imaginatively selected and updated daily. Vintage gowns and hats, shell suits, 80s shirts and shoes and accessories sold alongside each other in a visual array of colour. Rachael also stocks vintage children’s clothes, which I haven’t seen elsewhere. Dedicated customers can apply for a loyalty card scheme to. Bonus!

How did you’re the Yesterday Society come about?

I have always loved vintage and The Yesterday Society came about when I was working at the Tyneside Cinema as FOH. In my induction session, I met future friend and business partner Rosie Skett. Rosie was a fine art student at Newcastle Uni and we hit it off straight away. We worked at the Tyneside happily, but on one particularly boring bar shift we got to talking about our dream jobs, both agreeing that owning a vintage shop would be up there.

As anyone who knows me will admit I’m pretty laid back and would never have got around to doing it, but luckily Rosie was on the ball and went on her dinner break to look at the vacant units in the Grainger Market. One being Unit 9, the now home of The Yesterday Society.

From that point, everything seemingly fell into place we created a business plan, came up with a name after numerous suggestions (cat’s pyjamas anyone?), applied for finance, secured the unit, found suppliers and two months after that initial conversation in the Tyneside Bar we opened the doors to The Yesterday Society on 31st August 2013.

What inspires you?

I would say my love of vintage and retro clothes was my main inspiration in opening the shop. I love fashions of the past and to stand out from the crowd, and with vintage you can pretty much guarantee you will never see anyone wearing the same outfit. The ethical side of wearing vintage is a big thing for me too. I was brought up with very ‘waste not want not’ ideals and the current “throw away fashion” society does nothing for me. I would much rather recycle and revive a vintage piece that had history and life of its own previously than to just buy something new off the hanger.

The Yesterday Society, Grainger Market, Newcastle
The Yesterday Society, Grainger Market, Newcastle

Tell us a bit about yourself?

I am a Newcastle lass through and through and was raised in Walker. I believe my love of vintage and flamboyant clothes can be attributed to my mam who took me on shopping trips to treasure troves like Attica as a kid and was known to overdress for any occasion. I have always loved looking different and standing out from the crowd, this has taken many guises from goth on “Hippy Green” to super girly all pink outfits.

It was at Northumbria Uni while studying for a degree in Human Geography that I found my true style wearing vintage and mixing a variety of decades in one outfit. I’m not going to lie there was a couple of questionable outfits. Once walking into a lecture with a mate Jess and over hearing someone comment “what the hell are they wearing now”! But hey everyone makes mistakes.

To complete my degree, I managed to write my Human Geography dissertation on identity creation through vintage clothes, this fuelled my love of vintage and allowed me to go shopping while doing my research.

Who is your fashion hero/heroine?

I take inspiration from many different places and people. But the two people probably highest on the list would be David Bowie and Iris Apfel. Both display extremely unique styles and multiple looks sometimes in one outfit. Iris has a great eye, and to me always looks fabulous, something I aspire to do especially when I’m her age. Bowie made each style his own and always looked great.

Do you think Newcastle has a decent amount of vintage stockists?

That’s a tricky one, I believe that in terms of vintage shops Newcastle is behind other cities such as Manchester, Leeds and Glasgow, especially for a city with such a big student population. However, living in Newcastle all my life I have come to realise that vintage shops in the city tend to come and go a lot. The majority of vintage shops I included in my dissertation in 2009 (other than Retro and Flip) have all closed down. Newcastle does also host a lot of events from traveling vintage fairs.

 

Flip on Twitter: @FlipVintage

www.flipvintage.com

The Yesterday Society on Twitter: @theyesterdaysoc

theyesterdaysociety.co.uk