Category Archives: Artists

New challenges found in every work for watercolour artist Stuart

As part of our continuing series featuring creative people in the North East DAVID SIMPSON talks to 64 year old Peterlee-based watercolour artist, Stuart Fisher.

Durham Castle painted by Stuart Fisher
Durham Castle by Stuart Fisher

Where in the North East are you based? 

Our home and studio in Peterlee.

How would you describe your work? 

Architectural landscapes in watercolour.

Tell us how you first started out as an artist?

Thinking my job in architecture was at risk, I revisited painting, something that I hadn’t touched on since secondary school. In the late 1990s I produced a watercolour of a young colleague who had broken his neck in a competitive motocross competition.

This helped to raise funds to assist with his drastically altered lifestyle as he was paralysed from the neck down. I doorstepped Dunlop, one of his sponsors and sold the original for £1,000 after which I raised a further £1,000 from the sale of prints. That same colleague  remains a firm friend and incidentally, is an official mentor to the unfortunate victims of spinal injuries and those in the military who have suffered life-changing battlefield trauma.

Following this I was invited to mount a solo exhibition in a gallery in Corbridge in 2000 and have exhibited almost every year since, turning professional in 2010 with the launch of my website.

What work are you most proud of?

The commissioned painting depicting The Anglican Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham in North Norfolk. It was a great honour to be invited to produce this work for a shrine of global importance to the Anglican Church and I was especially pleased to be invited to its official unveiling attended by The Shrine Guardians in March of this year.

What inspires you?

There’s potential in almost everything I see and hear.

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

I don’t think that the North East is necessarily any more inspirational than any other region of Britain. That said, it is my base and as such has to be the source of my subject material. However with all my work, I attempt to add drama to subjects which have been done to death and which might otherwise be jaded to the eyes of the observer.

What has been your most challenging creation?

Watercolour is not a forgiving medium and as such many paintings have been consigned to the waste paper bin after hours of toil. There are new challenges to face in every painting. No matter how simple the subject may outwardly appear, there is always a hidden trap waiting to catch you out. The more you paint, the more you become aware of the potential pitfalls, the easier it gets.

The recently completed commissioned painting for The Anglican Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham had a number of challenges, very large size not the least of them. The fact that I’d never before attempted a garden of flowers was the most daunting aspect of the picture. I tiptoed around that section of the painting until I could no longer avoid diving in.

Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham Norfolk painted by Peterlee artist Stuart Fisher
Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham in Norfolk painted by Peterlee artist Stuart Fisher

Do you have any tips for up and coming artists?

Be diligent, work hard and don’t expect art to make itself. Find one person you respect to critique your work, a person you can accept criticism from without being offended. Take inspiration from the greats and aim high.

What other artists or photographers inspire you.

During my early years in architecture, we received calendars at Christmas from local reps. The most sought after of these depicted the work of Sir William Russell Flint (1880-1969) a man who in my opinion is the Genius of the art of watercolour painting. Perhaps most famous for his depiction of scantly clad ladies peppering his architectural landscapes, his style inevitably went out of fashion in the 1960s. However subject matter aside, his technical ability was and in my mind still is, unsurpassed!

Watercolour artist, Stuart Fisher
Watercolour artist, Stuart Fisher

What are your ambitions for the future?

Apart from continuous improvement, I’m not really sure. The 2016 commission to produce a painting of Durham Chorister School for its 600th anniversary is a past highlight. The then school Principal Yvette Day was recently appointed Head of Kings College Cambridge Chorister School. Without prior knowledge of the Chorister School building, the idea of eventually producing a portrait of such an iconic establishment definitely appeals.

Discover more of Stuart Fisher’s work at:

stuartfisher-art.co.uk

 

Pam captures beauty, emotion and memories in paint

DAVID SIMPSON talks to Tynemouth-based artist Pam Morton in the latest in our continuing series of blogs focusing on the region’s artists, photographers and creative people. 

How would you describe your work?

Illustrative bold atmospheric and as realistic as I feel it should be.

'Sunrise Reflections', North Shields Fish Quay by Pam Morton
‘Sunrise Reflections’, North Shields Fish Quay by Pam Morton

Tell us how you first started out as an artist?

I studied at Newcastle College of Art in the 1970s however I only started to paint 3 years ago when I retired.

What work are you most proud of?

I am very proud of my first painting “Madly Deeply” it was sold to Marjorie Walsh who is married to Joe Walsh (Eagles Band) now in their home Beverly Hills

What inspires you?

Beauty, emotion, memories of my subject.

'Quirky Tynemouth' by Pam Morton
‘Quirky Tynemouth’ by Pam Morton

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

I live in Tynemouth and it’s such a beautiful place full of character  and incredible landscape with a thriving social life.

What has been your most challenging creation?

My very first landscape “The Longsands” and “Quirky Tynemouth” I like to think they remind people of their days in Tynemouth whether it’s a walk along the beach or socialising in Tynemouth Village.

Do you have any tips for up and coming artists?

Practice and feel free to paint if it inspires you, also persevere even if you feel like giving up.

Tynemouth-based artist, Pam Morton
Tynemouth-based artist, Pam Morton

Which other artists or photographers inspire you?

Marcel Witte  is a Dutch painter who paints in such detail and every painting has a message. My favourite photographer is Coastal Portraits by Snappy photographer.

What are your ambitions for the future?

That people will continue to like my work.

To discover more of Pam’s work visit her website at www.pjmartworks.co.uk

Final Rehearsal by Pam Morton
Final Rehearsal by Pam Morton

www.pjmartworks.co.uk

Sea and Sky : Artist finds inspiration in Craster coastline

DAVID SIMPSON talks to Northumberland artist Mick Oxley about his wonderful seascapes.

As part of our continuing commitment highlighting the work of North East artists, photographers, film makers, writers, musicians and other creative people we talk to 64 year artist Mick Oxley who lives and works in Craster.

Boulmer Glory. Painted by Mick Oxley
Boulmer Glory. Painted by Mick Oxley

Describe yourself and your work:

A painter whose work is influenced by the sea and shoreline of the Northumberland coast, it’s moods and atmosphere.

How did you start out as an artist?

I started painting in 1999, after retiring from teaching and I am wheelchair bound. I began under the tutelage of Gordon Highmoor at a WEA class in Craster. I went full time in 2003 and opened my gallery in 2008. I paint and sell from Craster.

Which work are you most proud of?

To be honest, I am proud of a lot of my work, although I do have one or two favourites. While I have worked very hard to get where I am, I also consider myself fortunate I decided to give painting a go.

Mick Oxley at work
Mick Oxley at work

What inspires you?

My biggest influence is the environment that surrounds me – the coastline, the moods of the sea, the kaleidoscopic changes. This provides me with a never ending source of inspiration.

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

I grew up in the North East, left to work elsewhere and always wanted to return. The area and its people are very much part of my DNA.

What has been your most challenging creation?

Usually very large paintings, when I can struggle to reach across the canvas. Not being able to stand can pose problems and I have to be extra creative.

Do you have any tips for up and coming artists?

Enjoy what you do, have fun, practise as much as you can and you will improve.

Which other artists inspire you?

My two biggest influences are the North Yorkshire artist Len Tabner and Norwegian Ornulf  Opdahl. Both artists had a profound influence on me when I began painting.

February Sunrise. Painted by Mick Oxley.
February Sunrise. Painted by Mick Oxley.

What are your ambitions for the future?

My aim is to carry on enjoying what I do. I like the dual role of painting and running the gallery. I enjoy meeting the customers and working from Craster.

Visit Mick website at: www.mickoxley.com

Mick is also on Twitter @mickoxley   and   @seaskycraster 

and Facebook too facebook.com/mickoxleygallery

Better still, why not pop along to Mick’s gallery in Craster and take in the wonderful Northumberland coast while you’re there?