Sarah creates a sense of place in colourful magical maps

We talk to 49-year old Morpeth-based artist, Sarah Farooqi in the latest in our series of interviews featuring talented artists and photographers from the North East of England. Sarah is best-known for her wonderful, colourful illustrated maps.

The Quayside by Sarah Farooqi
The Quayside by Sarah Farooqi

How would you describe your work?

I am a watercolour artist specialising in landscapes, townscapes and illustrated maps. From a pen drawing, my pictures evolve into busy, layered compositions which reflect my love of detail and colour, and hopefully a sense of fun.

Tell us how you first started out as an artist?

I began drawing when I was old enough to hold a pencil and went on to study graphic design at university. But then I took a wrong turn into corporate TV graphics and lost my enthusiasm. So I trained and worked as a primary teacher until I became a full time mum. During that time I was asked by my local school to work with their youngest children on an art project.

However, I had to stop myself grabbing the paint brushes off the children as I just wanted to do it myself! I started painting again soon after, and have never looked back. I spent a year experimenting and finding out exactly what it was I wanted to paint and how. Then once I had a couple of finished pieces I took them to show lots of galleries, shops, the National Trust etc. until I had a few places willing to sell my prints/cards. I joined Network Artists and had a group exhibition at Alnwick Garden in 2009. From there I was asked to make visitor maps for Alnwick Garden and Castle.

Detail from the Howick Hall Estate Map
Detail from Sarah Farroqi’s Howick Hall Estate Map

What work are you most proud of?

In the visitor centre at Howick Hall Gardens (near Alnwick) there is a huge map detailing the whole of the Howick estate, its rare plants/trees and wildlife. The map took the best part of a year to complete and some of it was previously unmapped so I was able to work closely with their head gardener and other members of the Howick team. The map has had a very positive reaction from visitors and I am very proud of it.

What inspires you?

Everything really. I love being outdoors and the intricacy of the natural world. But I also can’t resist a bleak northern industrial scene (see below), or something unexpected or irreverent, as I don’t like to take things too seriously. I also have a terrible sense of direction, so if someone asks me to make them a map I am inspired by that challenge.

Sarah Farooqi
Sarah Farooqi

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

I grew up in Teesside and have fond memories of sketching at South Gare near Redcar. Home to the now ghosted blast furnace, at the time I loved peering through the railings and seeing the molten iron being poured into the trucks, and the architecture of the industrial landscape.

It was also right next to Paddy’s Hole with its fishermen’s huts and the North Sea. There is even a lighthouse at the end. Perfect!  Now I live in Northumberland I am totally spoilt by the North Northumberland coastline, with its empty windswept beaches and fabulous castles, and even more lighthouses. The fact that Northumberland is a bit of a secret to many people is also quite appealing – I like to help celebrate it.

What has been your most challenging creation?

Definitely the Howick Hall visitor map, as it involved mapping previously unchartered territory, working with a range of different groups, and the sheer scale of the project. I painted it on a series of squares which when laid out wouldn’t fit in any of the rooms in my house!

Howick Hall Estate Map
Howick Hall Estate Map by Sarah Farooqi

Do you have any tips for up and coming artists?

Never give up, and if you feel overwhelmed by the possibilities/challenges, take a deep breath, start at the beginning and just keep going. To begin with there will be set backs, and you need to go through these in order to learn how everything works. Also, if you are trying to make a living from your art, try and remember to put the customer/buyer at the centre of your marketing so that you make it as easy as possible for people to see, understand and buy your work. Also, being an artist can be a little isolating, so make sure you make connections with people and get out and about. All the other artists I know are really nice people, and happy to help.

Whch other artists or photographers inspire you?

The Cornish fisherman and artist Alfred Wallis who started painting on bits of old cardboard at the age of 68. Arthur Rackham, the Victorian artist whose work includes my favourite illustrations for the Wind in the Willows. Tove Jansson, who wrote and illustrated the Moomins. The stories, symbols and patterns in aboriginal art are fascinating. I am also amazed by the photos of Iceland by Benjamin Hardman, who I’ve just started following on Instagram.

What are your ambitions for the future?

More commissioned work, more of my own work, maybe expand my portfolio from Northumbria into Yorkshire and beyond, and one day to have a fabulous studio. I’d also like to illustrate a children’s book.

See more of Sarah’s work at www.sarahfarooqi.co.uk

Chalk, charcoal and jam sandwiches are a source of pride for artist Alfie

In our latest blog featuring North East artists we talk to the multi-talented Alfie Joey. Alfie, 50, is a writer, stand-up comic, impressionist, singer and breakfast time presenter on Radio Newcastle. Here Alfie talks about his artwork and how he is inspired to paint and draw.

Jam Sandwiches
Jam Sandwiches by Alfie Joey

How would you describe your work?

Caricature and local heritage pictures.

Tell us how you first started out as an artist:

I drew a picture of Winston Churchill at infant school and I was told by Mrs. Derby I had to show it to the headteacher Mr. Smith who was more than encouraging!

What work are you most proud of?

The first chalk and charcoal sketch I sold was called Jam Sandwiches- it is 3 coal miners eating bait down the pit.

Alfie Joey
North East artist Alfie Joey

What inspires you?

My art hero is the legendary Broadway cartoonist Al Hirschfeld.

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

The North East is littered with gorgeous landmarks that lend themselves to art work!

What has been your most challenging piece?

I had 2 days to draw a very busy cartoon cover of NE1 Magazine.

Do you have any tips for up and coming  artist?

There are endless tips and teachers for free on YouTube and Instagram.

Trimdon Colliery by Alfie Joey
Trimdon Colliery by Alfie Joey

 What other artists inspire you!?

Locally, Alexander Millar, Ben Holland and of course, Norman Cornish!

What are your ambitions for the future?

To have my children’s picture books published.

My work is on display and for sale at the North East Art Collective in Eldon Garden, Newcastle and from August, Spennymoor Town Hall, County Durham.

See more of Alfie’s work  on Instagram and Facebook:

www.instagram.com/alfiejoey.art/

www.facebook.com/AlfieJoeyArt/

Sycamore Gap
Sycamore Gap by Alfie Joey

 

Adam finds passion and perspective in the ‘Lang Shot’

In our latest blog featuring North East artists and photographers DAVID SIMPSON talks to 44-year-old Gateshead-based photographer Adam Lang of Lang Shot Photography.

Boat By The Bridge by Lang Shot Photography
Boat By The Bridge by Lang Shot Photography

How would you describe your work?

Somewhere between city scapes and street photography, its constantly changing as I explore different types of photography.

Tell us how you first started out as an artist?

I bought a decent camera (Sony A5000) to take on a trip to Prague a few years ago. I took typical holiday snap shots with it and that’s as far as it went. Around 6 months later I started shooting pictures of the bridges around the Quayside.

When I figured out how to take long exposures I was hooked and spent many a morning wandering the streets of Newcastle when anybody with any sense was still in bed. I posted the results on my Facebook profile and got lots of praise from friends and family so I started a Facebook page to show my work, the reception was great and it just seemed to grow in no time at all.

Grey Street @ Dawn by Lang Shot Photography
Grey Street @ Dawn by Lang Shot Photography

What work are you most proud of?

That’s a difficult one. I’m normally proud of work that produces a style or mood that I’ve never done before. I’m very proud of my High Bridge shot, it gave me confidence to be different and was instrumental in developing my style.

High Bridge by Lang Shot Photography
High Bridge, Newcastle by Lang Shot Photography

What inspires you?

Comic book art and the look of film noir. My surroundings and the people around me are always inspiration, there is always beauty or a mood to be captured if you look.

Adam Lang photographed by Darren William Hall
Adam Lang photographed by Darren William Hall

What influence if any does North East England have in inspiring your work?

Newcastle is such a photogenic city and is small enough to walk around. Living so close to Newcastle means there is always something for me to shoot. The people of the North East have been great in responding to my work, I’m not sure if it’s true of everywhere but the people from here love the area and seeing pictures of it in all its glory.

Autumn Quay by Lang Shot Photography
Autumn Quay by Lang Shot Photography

What has been your most challenging creation?

I’d say a shot of the Corn Exchange in Leeds. The place is huge and trying to capture the scale wasn’t easy. The end result is one of my favourite shots and went down great with the people of Leeds. I’ve used the same methods to create shots in Newcastle which captures the area in a way I haven’t seen too often.

Leeds Corn Exchange by Lang Shot Photography
Leeds Corn Exchange by Lang Shot Photography

Do you have any tips for up and coming photographers?

Take risks and don’t be afraid to fail. I was very close to not publishing a shot as I thought I’d maybe over processed it and would attract lots of criticism. I showed it to my father who said I should post it as it was interesting so post it I did.

The amount of likes it received was like nothing I’d seen before. A typical shot would attract a few hundred likes on Facebook, this one got two and a half thousand and was seen by around a hundred and fifty thousand people.

Which other artists or photographers inspire you?

There is a comic book artist/painter named Bill Sienkiewicz who I just love. The first time I saw his work was when I was around 13, it was a painted cover and the perspective and proportions didn’t seem to make sense but the mix of red and white in the painting was beautiful. I still love that cover and follow his work on Instagram religiously.

Swinging Bridge Sky by Lang Shot Photography
Swinging Bridge Sky by Lang Shot Photography

What are your ambitions for the future?

I’d love to make a living through my photography but not at the expense of my passion for it. I get so much enjoyment from shooting and processing my shots and I’d hate to lose that. I’ve had a few people asking me to teach them. This is something I’ll be looking at shortly. I’d eventually love a gallery or shop somewhere when the time is right.

The Theatre Royal by Lang Shot Photography
The Theatre Royal by Lang Shot Photography

Anything else you’d like to addd?

I’m always open to collaborations so get in touch if you have any ideas.

To see more of Adam’s fabulous photographs visit www.langshotphotography.com

See Adam’s work on Instagram at:

And on Facebook at:

 

Tourist Trap: £103 and a bag of nuts to see a waterfall

DAVID SIMPSON reveals how a bit of innocent chatter, a failed download, three rejected coins and a bag of nuts resulted in a £103 charge to see England’s best waterfall.

High Force
High Force waterfall, Teesdale. Photo David Simpson

A roaring awesome force of nature, High Force waterfall is one of the most beautiful and remarkable features of the North East landscape. People come from far and wide to enjoy this majestic ‘force’ pouring its foamy waters at roaring pace over the imposing slate-black rocks of the Great Whin Sill.  I wonder, though, how many people know that if they’re not too careful, they may end up paying more than a hundred pounds for the privilege?

I hadn’t been to the waterfall for a while so with some delightful sunny weather to enjoy I headed off to Teesdale, stopping at bonny Barnard Castle and the pretty village of Romaldkirk along the way. A little nearer to my destination I then called in at lovely Middleton-in-Teesdale to draw out some cash on my driving route to ‘feel the force’. Now ‘Fors’ is a Viking word meaning ‘waterfall’ by the way and has nothing to do with a force of power or the enforcement of fines for that matter – at least not as far as we know.

I haven’t been to High Force for about three years now – to my great shame, High Force should be at least an annual visit for anyone in the North East. Having been diverted at so many wonderful stops along the way I didn’t get to the High Force car park until just before 5pm. I’d never been there that late in the evening – though it’s hardly what you’d call ‘night time’ at the height of summer.  I then see a sign at the car park saying the fall closes at 5pm with the last admission at 4.30pm. Looks like I’m too late.

Low Force waterfall
Low Force waterfall, Teesdale. Photo © David Simpson 2018

I was a bit confused, did this mean that the entire pathway to get to the fall was closed or do they enclose the waterfall in some kind of iron cage to keep people out? In fact, as it turns out, the path doesn’t close at all, you can still stroll along the riverside to within a literal stone’s throw of the fall. The only limitation is that after hours you will find a locked gate near the fall beyond which you can go no further. Don’t worry though you’re still more than close enough to get a decent view or a photo.

If only I’d known all of this a bit sooner as I’d have saved myself £100 pounds but you see I have a problem; I’m a bit of a chatterbox. No sooner had I parked  the car then I got into a conversation with some friendly visitors and ramblers. Now when I say ramblers, I  mean walkers. Their conversation, I should say, was far from rambling and was pleasantly engaging, though as it turned out disastrously engaging. “Can I still get to the fal” I innocently asked, “or is the path closed?” I wanted to be sure. No point in paying a £3 car parking fee for nothing.

Soon there was a suggestion to walk back downstream to Low Force and cross a footbridge to reach the High Force from the other side of the river  (on what used to be the Yorkshire side – where unlike the Durham side they don’t charge you). There was also a suggestion from these helpful visitors that I take in Summerhill Force at Gibson’s Cave and see the Low Force as well. I should confess, that I hadn’t been to either for some time (again to my shame), at least not since I was a kid, so I wasn’t sure how long that walk would take.

As the conversation continued, I took little notice of the time. I can’t be sure but I suspect that by this time more than 10 minutes had already elapsed. Eventually another curious conversational visitor interjected and explained that I could in fact still get pretty close to the “big one” from the Durham side; certainly close enough for a photo and so I decided to commit to the parking, which was going to cost me a minimum of £3 which I could see from where I was standing and confirmed by the conversation.

£3 seemed reasonable enough, so I fished out my £10 note, fresh from the Middleton cash point, only to find that the machine wouldn’t take notes – unlike the nearby cameras which it seems take notes of your every move with a view to taking much more than a trusty tenner – but more on that in a moment. Also, there was no facility for accepting cards in the parking machine as you often find on remote car parks near Hadrian’s Wall.

I saw then that there was a parking ‘app’ that you can download to your phone. Great, I thought, I love a bit of simple technology – so I downloaded the application onto my phone, or at least I tried to. From what I remember it aborted on two or three goes, causing much frustration and taking much precious time before I eventually succeeded. Time was still ticking away.

Low Force waterfall, Teesdale.
Low Force waterfall, Teesdale.

Now I’m no technophobe, or at least I like to think that I’m not, but I couldn’t get this app to accept the input of letters from my number plate on my phone – something which, incidentally, the nearby cameras seem to have no problem reading. I decided the best course of action was to get some loose change, so I popped into the handy High Force Hotel right next to the car park and waited patiently for a thirsty couple in front of me, who were buying a not-to-quick round of early evening drinks for their numerous friends, to get served. Again, unbeknown to me, time was ticking away.

With the couple served, I decided to get myself a bag of nuts plus change from my tenner as it occurred to me that this hotel must get a constant stream of annoying people asking for change to feed into the coin-sucking parking machines nearby. At least, with the nuts, I had made a purchase that would benefit the hotel.

So you’d think I was sorted? Well, actually, no. For some reason  the parking machine didn’t like my coins at first or at least didn’t like my level of concentration or understanding of the payment process in that evening heat. No, it just wouldn’t accept those coins, coughing them out on several occasions without hesitation until eventually a new set of three pound coins was happily accepted and the parking ticket was finally there in my hands.

So with my three pounds paid and the said ticket placed on the dashboard, as instructed, it was time to explore. What I didn’t know, however, was that time had already ticked its final tock and taken its £100 toll. What I didn’t know was that despite the payment of £3, the camera had clocked my time of arrival with its number plate recognition technology and decided that I was a dreadful offender.  It was only when I’d paid that £3 fee that I was approached by one of the friendly visitors who I’d been talking to a few minutes earlier. Warily, if a little tardy in his thoughts, he asked rhetorically: “you have seen the ‘small print’ about the £100 fine after 10 minutes?”

Sadly, I had not, and for that matter nor had the talkative lady standing nearby. She confessed she hadn’t seen it either but was confident that she had paid for her ticket on time.  At this point you might have heard me exclaim “*$!~**#!”  or words to that effect. There it was: a little warning in amongst the usual T&Cs, about a £100 fine for anyone who fails to pay within ten minutes of arrival. Now rules are rules, but this seemed like a little case of extortion to me; a ridiculous sum for a silly error, perhaps even a case of bullying you might say.

Summerhill Force and Gibson's Cave.
Summerhill Force and Gibson’s Cave.

I had that sudden horrible feeling I’d been there much more than ten minutes but couldn’t be certain but thought it was a reasonable and honest mistake and as I’d paid my parking fee I thought perhaps things would be okay. On the other hand, perhaps I am just hopefully naïve.

So off I went on my stroll. It’s always a great feeling of anticipation as you approach ‘the High Force’ on the thickly wooded pathway and can hear it, though not at first see it, getting closer and closer until eventually it reveals itself in all its glory in a gap amongst the trees. I waited for a group of teens larking around at the locked gate – one of whom had unsafely climbed over the neighbouring fence towards the fall. Having made her way back across the fence and onto the path, the group departed for home, leaving me to take a few photos and admire the view from the gate, quite contently.

It had been sunny for several days so the High Force  in these dry conditions wasn’t in full spate but the powerful flow was still more than enough to impress. On the way back along the path leading to the fall I passed a couple of young blokes heading in the direction of the force clutching a veritable picnic of alcoholic drinks who were clearly intending to venture beyond the locked gate and have the after hours waterfall all to themselves for the rest of the evening. I hope they remembered to pay their parking fee.

Having paid £3 which covers a maximum of 3 hours I decided to get my money’s worth so acting on the advice of my recently found friendly band of car park advisers I tried out the walk heading downstream to take in Low Force on the Tees and the Summerhill Force at Gibson’s cave which is along the nearby Bowlees Beck. Within less than an hour I’d managed to fit in High Force and these other two falls (I’m a brisk walker) and I must say all the waterfalls are stupendous.

Low Force is every bit as good as the comparable Aysgarth Falls down in  Wensleydale – if not better – and is found in two close-by groups of falls that can be enjoyed from the neighbouring fields or from the wonderfully wobbly single-file pedestrian suspension bridge that crosses the Tees here. Gibson’s Cave and the Summerhill Force are wonderful too – reached along the beautiful wooded dene of the Bowlees Beck from Bowlees and even on this relatively dry day the sight of that lovely waterfall trickling over the cave is a pretty and picturesque sight to behold.

Sadly, all these sights and sounds on this pleasant summer’s evening were more than a little overshadowed by the distinctly unpleasant and unexpected possibility of a £100 parking fine.

Nine days passed and I’d quite forgotten about my visit to the ‘forces’ when I received a midday Monday letter of shall I say ‘high enforcement’ from a Liverpool-based company with the rather intimidating name of Civil Enforcement Ltd. Their letter, issued on and presumably also posted on a Friday*,  was received  with the following demand: “Amount due within 28 days: £100″ and “Reduced amount due if paid within 14 days: £60″.  In fact the 14 days was now 11 and a half days notice due to the delay in receiving the letter.

Now although £60 still seems to me like a proverbial ‘day light robbery’, in the circumstances it’s much less to pay and much more palatable than paying £100. It was very tempting to pay this, caving in to a bit of ‘tactical’ bullying you might say. However, I feel I have been unlucky and not properly warned of the fine rather than dishonest, so I decided to stick to my guns and hold out for what I think is right.  Anyway, I’ve appealed, and if I fail in this appeal I will then have the option of using the independent ‘Parking on Private Land Appeals (POPLA)’ service. If your appeal with POPLA is still unsuccessful you must then pay the full £100, so it’s a risk – which of course the parking enforcers must presumably know only too well.

As a penance for my unwitting error I have offered to pay £7 (in addition to the £3 already paid) as I think that £10 is a reasonable sum for an honest mistake. It’s also a very decent sum for the car park considering the time I was there – whereas £60 is not. We’ll see what they say. Just don’t hold your breath.

I just think that this is all a bit of a sting that can make money out of the unwitting public for a lapse of ten minutes? That’s certainly not enough time to do anything useful or see any of the sites or reach the waterfall, but more than enough to catch one or two chatty or temporarily distracted people like me unawares.

All that it would take, in my view, to avoid this would be a prominent sign at the entrance to the car park saying that you must pay within ten minutes of entering or receive a fine – it’s the one thing that any visitor would certainly want to know above anything else. This could be done very easily to make absolutely sure that people are aware of the possible fine. The car park could also make it clearer about accessibility to the fall after 4.30pm as it was clarifying this ambiguity that cost me the time more than anything else.  What makes me cross is it’s not like I didn’t pay at all or do anything dishonest, I just wanted to confirm that I was going to be able to see what I had come to see before I paid the car park money and committed to stay. It is after all ‘The High Force Car Park’.

I’ve asked Civil Enforcement Ltd, the company which collects car parking revenue on behalf of the landowners to consider my appeal. I’ve also asked if they would provide me with some details of how much they receive in revenue from fines at this particular car park.  If they respond to this particular request of information, I’ll let you know what they say.

Raby Castle
Raby Castle. High Force  is on the lands of the Raby estate. © David Simpson 2018

Don’t let this put you off visiting High Force and its nearby waterfalls though. There’s still parking at the Bowlees Visitor Centre – where there’s a suggested parking donation. The walk from Bowlees to Summerhill and all the other waterfalls including High Force is very pleasing. If you do decide to park at the High Force Car Park, however, which is certainly more convenient for that particular waterfall then just make sure you pay within ten minutes of arrival or you might just end up feeling the force of a very hefty fine.

High Force Visitor information:

High Force is situated on the lands of the Raby estate: Raby Castle

Visit the High Force website at: Highforcewaterfall.co.uk

Opening Times: High Force is open daily 10am-5pm (4pm winter).

Last admission: Half an hour before closing.

Car parking: £3 for 3 hours or £6 for 6 hours

Pay within 10 minutes of arriving

Admission to falls: Adults: 16+ £1.50, Children 5-15: 50p.

Parking at the site is managed by  Civil Enforcement Limited

 

UPDATE: My appeal was rejected by Civil Enforcement Ltd, however they did give me a further 14 days to pay at the reduced rate of £60 and I decided to pay that, reluctantly.

Raby Estate had only introduced the new parking system in May (2018) though I was unaware of this at the time. According to a story in The Northern Echo in response to my experience and that of others, Raby Estate have now extended the period of grace for parking payment at the High Force Car Park. Unfortunately this didn’t make any difference to me, because – as I understand it – the period of grace had not come into force at that time.

I would strongly suggest that Raby Estate ask for an improvement in the signage at the car park to ensure that people are aware of the risk of payment delays as soon as they enter the car park. Even if there is a period of grace, discovering there’s a fine after a 10 minute period has elapsed could be stressful to elderly visitors or those on low income.

I’d also suggest they consider finding a new company to manage their parking when the opportunity arises as I think the company’s lack of leniency does not necessarily work in the best interests of their client, unless of course Raby Estate only consider its visitors a means of making money and nothing more. I know I am not the only one to have been caught by this charge and I would suggest that it could be potentially damaging to an important element of Teesdale’s tourism industry.

Finally, I’d like to add that despite my experience I should say that High Force, Raby Castle and Teesdale itself are absolute gems that all deserve to be better known. My intention in creating this website was to highlight the wonderful heritage of the North East region, its history, landscape and places to visit, but occasionally, reluctantly, you sometimes have to draw attention to negative things that could be much improved.